Ars Amatoria


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Ars Amatoria

Ovid’s treatise on lovemaking. [Rom. Lit.: Magill IV, 45]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ars Amatoria, the companion piece to the Remedia Amoris, is
There is the early Ovid, the love poet who composed the Amores (Experiences of Love), the Ars Amatoria, and Remedia Amoris (Love Therapy), and the stylized letters of mythological women to their lovers, Epistulae Heroidum.
Erotic themes wind through Pinos's work like a red thread: Ars amatoria (1967), Geneze [Genesis] (1970), Hudba pro dva [Music for Two] (1971), Canti intimi (1976), lyrical songs for bass baritone and string quartet on text from old love poems called Sila a moc lasky [The Strength and Power of Love] (1982), Euforie [Euphoria] I-V (five chamber pieces for different instrumental combinations of 1983-1998), Priblizeni [Gettin Closer] (1994).
Alluding to Ovid's banishment from Rome to the distant shores of the Black Sea for offending the emperor Augustus in his Ars Amatoria, Lowell mentions "black" three times.
Dolores came up with the evocative name Ovidio, suggesting the great story-teller of Metamorphoses and the Ars Amatoria.
Furthermore, Ovid (Ars Amatoria 1.416) and Plutarch (Quaestiones Convivales 4.6.2.671D-672A) describe the Sabbath as a day of feasting.
A second option is "Est Deus in nobis." This is from Ovid's Ars Amatoria and translates to "There is god in us" (3.549).
Although married, Rudolf's main passion is Wanda, an attractive fellow student, who is mad about Rudolf practicing the "ars amatoria" in all imaginable forms.
The reception of Ovid's Ars amatoria in the medieval West and the ways in which the erotic discourses of the period were shaped by it have a venerable scholarly pedigree, but in this theoretically informed and challenging book Marilynn Desmond offers a fresh perspective, using Ovid's didactic poem and the medieval texts that draw on it to explore 'the ways in which heteroerotics has historically been constructed so that it has the potential to eroticize violence' (p.
The Ars Amatoria was composed in two stages between 1 BC and AD 2 and has been variously described as an elegy on seduction (it is written in elegiac couplets, a Greek format) and sexual attraction or as a parody on didactic verse.