Art Nouveau architecture

Art Nouveau architecture

(1880–1910)
A movement in European architecture and applied arts, developed principally in France and Belgium, characterized by flowing and sinuous organic and dynamic forms, naturalistic ornament and a strict avoidance of any historical traits. Other names for the style include Le Modern Style (France); Jugendstil (Germany), after the German term for youth style; Stile Liberty (Italy), named after the Liberty and Company store in London; Modernismo (Spain); and Sezession (Austria), named after its proponents seceded from the Academy of Art in Vienna. The style drew primarily on Baroque, Gothic and Moorish traditions, but was mainly unbounded by rules. Art Nouveau exploited the machine and reveled in the possibilities of decorative tiles and wrought iron. This was a deliberate attempt to put an end to imitations of past styles. In its place was a free type of architecture that integrated arts and crafts and architectural forms.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Reopening a year later, the pub was fully restored, remaining sympathetic to its original art nouveau architecture and design.
All the rooms had hot water, telephones for calling reception and air conditioning, amenities that were then considered forward thinking, and in addition to being luxurious, the Lutetia was lauded for being a fine example of Art Nouveau architecture.
It was designed by Benjamin Simpson, of the firm of Simpson, Lawson and Rayne, and is a prime example of Edwardian extravagance, fusing both baroque and art nouveau architecture together.
The cultural center is one of Mexico City's most notable landmarks and an exquisite combination of Art Nouveau architecture and Art Deco interior design.
Sometimes referred to as "Small Paris," Riga features distinctive Art Nouveau architecture along with medieval stone buildings and well-preserved wooden architecture from the 17th and 18th centuries.
Art nouveau architecture, lively cafes and legendary hospitality: Tbilisi is rich in rewards.
Riga, the country's capital is described as "home to museums and churches, notable wooden and art nouveau architecture, a vast Central Market and a medieval Old Town."
Then it's onwards and upwards to Alesund, with its amazing art nouveau architecture, beautiful Sunnylvsfjord and back to Newcastle via Hellesylt, the fairytale jewel of Geiranger, and Bergen, Norway's second-largest city.
2 LJUBLJANA from PS283pp for two nights (flights extra) With its eye-catching Art Nouveau architecture, pretty embankment along the river and a wealth of churches, the Slovenian capital is great for budding photographers.
In what was once a palace, Iberian art melds with art nouveau architecture; colours flow seamlessly from being garishly vibrant to quietly mellow; the garden looks straight out of a Mediterranean brochure.