blood gas

(redirected from Arterial blood gas)
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Related to Arterial blood gas: Venous Blood Gas

blood gas

[′bləd ‚gas]
(ordnance)
War gas which, when absorbed into the body, primarily by breathing, affects body functions by interfering with transfer of oxygen from the lungs via the blood to tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Correlation of central venous and arterial blood gas measurements in mechanically ventilated trauma patients.
Results suggested that, the improvement of respiratory failure associated clinical symptoms, respiratory function indexes and arterial blood gas indexes of the research group was superior to that of the control group which did not apply NO inhalation.
Venous blood gas analysis reflects the acid-base balance at a cellular level, whereas arterial blood gas analysis provides information about ventilation, tissue perfusion, and the efficiency of respiratory gas exchange in the lungs.
Reasons for obtaining a therapeutic arterial blood gas included changes in level of consciousness (n=5, 16%), shortness of breath (n=9, 28%), follow up after a prior blood gas {n=8, 25%), both changes in level of consciousness and shortness of breath (n=5, 16%), both shortness of breath and follow up after a prior blood gas (n=2, 6%), or other (n=3, 9%).
Room air arterial blood gas analysis revealed a pH of 7.37, a PCO [sub]2 of 62 mmHg, and a PO [sub]2 of 54 mmHg.
Figure 1: Oxygen saturation at various time intervals following admission measured using pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis.
These infants require an umbilical artery catheter to obtain arterial blood gas (ABG) every 30 minutes to 4 hours for accurate monitoring of gas exchange.
In 33 patients, arterial blood gas samples were obtained 15 minutes after the incision, after each bleeding event (loss of at least 400 ml of blood in 40 minutes), and at the end of the surgery.
Once set, the settings are static, until changed again by the operator on the basis of changing monitored parameters such as respiratory rate, pulse oximetry (Sp[O.sub.2]), end tidal C[O.sub.2] (PetC[O.sub.2]) or intermittent arterial blood gas (ABG) measurements.