Arthrosis


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arthrosis

[är′thrō·səs]
(anatomy)
An articulation or suture uniting two bones.
(medicine)
Any degenerative joint disease.

Arthrosis

 

chronic metabolic disease of the joints, accompanied by changes in the articular surfaces of the bones.

Arthrosis may arise as a result of intoxication, infectious disease (for example, typhus and syphilis), joint trauma (fracture of the articular extremities of the bones, injury to articular cartilage), and also with significant functional overwork of the joint (for example, in ballet dancers and longshoremen). Chilling (for instance, among workers in hot factories) is known to be a significant factor.

The basis of the disease is disruption of nutrition to the articular (epiphyseal) extremities of the bone. As a result of changes in the permeability of the blood vessels that nourish the bone or of injury to them, aseptic necroses arise, aggravating the joint disease. Thus, the disease is progressive.

At first, pathological changes appear in the internal (synovial) membrane of the bursa, later affecting the cartilage covering the articular surfaces of the bones. The cartilage is gradually destroyed, baring the bone. Osteal tissue is split in some places, thickened in others; thornlike spines are formed. A clinical picture of deforming arthrosis develops.

Arthrosis develops most often in the hips, knees, and first metatarsophalangeal joints. Usually middle-aged and elderly persons are affected. The disease is manifested by pains which appear gradually, occur periodically, and are aggravated after intense physical overwork, or contrariwise, after a prolonged state of rest. Joint mobility is curtailed as a result of pain. Nerve trunks and tissues surrounding the joints become inflamed. Joint function suffers as a result of defensive tensing of the muscles.

Treatment is given on an outpatient basis and in sanatoriums and health resorts (Tskhaltubo, Evpatoriia). Pain-relievers, hormonal preparations (adrenocorticotropic hormones), physiotherapy (thermal and ultrasonic procedures), therapeutic exercise, and massage are prescribed. In serious cases surgery (arthrodesis, arthroplasty) is required.

References in periodicals archive ?
Classifications in Brief: The Eaton-Littler Classification of Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Arthrosis. Clin Orthop Relat Res.
As the treatment goal was to avoid arthrosis in the long term, the authors suggested that the meta-carpotrapezial K-wire fixation method of percutaneous pinning may cause additional damages to the articular surface.
(13), with 2,398 individuals aged 65 years and over, showed association between arthritis / rheumatism / arthrosis and lower HS, even after adjusting for other diseases and socioeconomic factors.
These X-rays show better degenerative changes of the cervical spine; disco-uncarthrosis (a, white arrowheads), interarticular posterior staggered arthrosis (a, b, black arrowheads), and anterior marginal osteophytosis (b, black-framed white arrowheads).
Yavuzer, "Kinetic and kinematic characteristics of gait in patients with medial knee arthrosis," Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, vol.
Although the patient had arthrosis of the wrist joint with subluxation of DRUJ, the patient is doing fine with no impairment in functional daily activity and without change of occupation (Figure 3).
Hence bionic TB powder has taken place of TB and has been widely used in clinical practice to treat osteoporosis and arthrosis.
The reason why patients seek medical help for the first time is pain, which usually occurs in primary arthrosis after certain physical effort such as longer walking (especially on rough ground), running, carrying load, performing heavy physical work, etc.
- Hip joint arthrosis. - Knee arthrosis - knee pain.
His medical past history was remarkable for recurrent left radiculopathy linked with facet joint arthrosis and disc herniations from L3 to S1.
Sequelae include loss of height, heel widening subfibular impingement, calcaneocuboid joint impingement, varus heel, and posttraumatic arthrosis. Infection, malalignment, type of fracture, early weight-bearing can lead to malunion.
(12) Table 1 provides two examples of guidance for hip arthrosis and severe to moderate depression.