Arthur Burns

Burns, Arthur

 

Born Apr. 27, 1904, in Stanisławów, Galicia. American bourgeois economist. Graduated from Columbia University (1925); professor there (from 1933).

Burns headed the Council of Economic Advisers under President Eisenhower (1953–56). He has been president of the American Economic Association (1959), president of the Academy of Political Science (1961), chairman of the National Bureau of Economic Research (1967), and adviser to President Nixon on domestic economic problems (since 1969). Burns is the author of works analyzing the changes in the economic cycle of the USA that set in after World War II under the influence of government intervention and of structural changes in the economy. In the area of state regulation of the economy, he advocates the use of various economic levers, depending on the characteristics of the cycle.

WORKS

Measuring Business Cycles. New York, 1946. (With W. Mitchell.)
Economic Research and the Keynesian Thinking of Our Times. New York, 1946.
Production Trends in the US Since 1870. New York, 1950.
The Frontiers of Economic Knowledge. Princeton, 1954.
Prosperity Without Inflation. New York, 1958.
The Management of Prosperity. New York-London, 1966.

E. A. LEBEDEVA

References in periodicals archive ?
Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian is a journalist and Arthur Burns fellow.
Explains Arthur Burns, professor of Modern British History at King's College London: 'The exhibit will reveal how the individual lives of these two notable--but also exceptionally privileged--men reflected in all kinds of unexpected ways the complex and changing societies in which they lived, and the economic, cultural, and political globalization that was as much a feature of their lives as our own, and as much a source of challenge and controversy then as now.
Economists often describe the Great Inflation of the 1970s as a failure of monetary policy actions of the Federal Reserve under former Chairman Arthur Burns.
President Richard Nixon's 1972 re-election campaign, he sternly lectured Fed chair Arthur Burns on the need for pump-priming the economy to help him defeat his Democratic challenger, George McGovern.
During US President Richard Nixon's 1972 re-election campaign, he sternly lectured Fed chair Arthur Burns on the need for pump-priming the economy to help him defeat his Democratic challenger, George McGovern.
The stagnating state of the economy in 1956 was a cause of concern for the Eisenhower administration during an election year, so Eisenhower encouraged Arthur Burns, then on the CEA, to push the Fed toward monetary easement (Meltzer 2009a, 135).
There was some support within the Reagan camp, but Arthur Burns, a former chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, nixed it.
Some of the lads Raymond walked with to Ayresome Park included Billy Johnson, Alan Walters, Alan Watson and Arthur Burns.
His account of the relationship between the professor and the President coverAEs MoynihanAEs counseling of the President on cultural and intellectual matters, as well as the Presidents support for Moynihan in the latterAEs battles with conservative economist Arthur Burns.
Arthur Burns and June Edwards ripped up the rule book after falling for each other and are this weekend set to undertake the ultimate expression of their love.
The senators should read "Inside the Nixon Administration: The Secret Diary of Arthur Burns, 1969-1974,'' and "How Richard Nixon Pressured Arthur Burns: Evidence from the Nixon Tapes,'' by Burton A.
When Alan Greenspan assumed the chairmanship in 1987, critics complained that the acolyte of former Chairman Arthur Burns was too political.