Arthur Rackham


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Rackham, Arthur

(răk`əm), 1867–1939, English illustrator and watercolorist. He is known for imaginative, delicately colored, and cheerful pen drawings, especially for children's books. Among these are Peter Pan (1906), Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1907), and A Christmas Carol (1915).

Bibliography

See study by D. Hudson (1960, repr. 1974).

References in periodicals archive ?
The human lovers looked handsome in their Edwardian off-to-play-tennis linens and lace, while in the supernatural realm, Oberon and Tytania (her complex coloratura well-handled by soprano Suzanne Rigden) glittered in blue and black sequins, and the undulating, ever-moving boy fairies of the chorus could have come straight out of an Arthur Rackham print.
Lewis learned that the joy experienced through nature (or literature or art such as Arthur Rackham's illustrations) only hints at a mystical force much larger, much deeper.
I can tweak the features of the photos to make the faces happier, sadder, more pensive and, after scanning my artwork, I continue to play around with it on the computer." Kershaw admires different ceramic work, but she is perhaps more inspired and influenced by illustrators, especially children's book illustrators, such as Dave McKean, Arthur Rackham and Edward Gorey.
Mike explains: "Children's classics like Alice in Wonderland, Wind in the Willows, Peter Pan and Winnie-the-Pooh are remembered often as much for their illustrations as they are for their stories, while other artists such as Arthur Rackham, Edmund Dulac, E.H.
Kusama's self-identification with Alice perhaps explains what distinguishes this beautiful example of book art from the many other attempts to add pictures to Dodgson's words--from Sir John Tenniel's original designs to the painterly approach of Salvador Dali or the skilled draftsmanship of Arthur Rackham.
Other illustrators included Arthur Rackham and Kate Greenaway.
She also provides thorough captioning and context for the illustrations created by Arthur Rackham and others, a cinematic survey of Peter Pan on screen, and a montage of letters, magazine excerpts, and reviews.
There are so many crooked houses and twisted streets, it could have been drawn by Arthur Rackham.
The list of writers and thinkers whose works will be available online for free includes Arthur Rackham, the illustrator whose drawings appeared in early versions of children's books such as Peter Pan and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, the novelist Ford Madox Ford, and Howard Carter, the archaeologist who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamen in Egypt.
Bloomsbury Auctions' sale also includes pictures and letters by Arthur Rackham, a 19th century fairytale illustrator; a privately printed edition of The Tailor of Gloucester by Beatrix Potter; rare Oz books by L Frank Baum; the works of art by children's illustrator Tom Feelings; a collection of letters between Roald Dahl and his publisher Alfred A Knopf; and a rare edition of Maurice Sendak's first picture book Good Shabbos, Everybody.
Lewis' episodes were set off either by his experiences of nature (standing next to a flowering currant bush) or as a result of his childhood reading of Beatrix Potter and a collection of Nordic myths gloriously illustrated by Arthur Rackham. The intensely bookish Lewis saw everything through a literary prism; a tendency that occasionally exasperated the Joy that surprised him most in later life-his wife, Joy Davidman.