UCITA

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UCITA

(Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act) A controversial law that deals with software contracts and licensing drafted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL). UCITA is designed to favor the software publishers, because it enforces the license agreements and assumptions created by their attorneys. For example, the notion that software is licensed rather than purchased is a major tenet upheld in UCITA. Among other things, it enables the publisher to remotely shut down the customer's application without a court order, to prohibit a customer from transferring ownership of the software to another party and to stipulate under what jurisdiction legal disputes will be resolved.

Article 2B
Initially drafted as Article 2B, an amendment to the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), the NCCUSL turned it into a non-UCC recommendation and adopted it as a proposed uniform act in 1999. UCITA passed quickly in Maryland and Virginia in 2000 and remains the law in those states. But opposition organized just as rapidly, and bowing to intense consumer and industry pressure by August of 2003, the NCCUSL withdrew its campaign for legislative passage in the remaining 48 states. Despite this lack of official sponsor support, many vendors and buyers of software still believe that a uniform licensing law is needed. Stay tuned!
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Lawmakers say the foundation of Maryland's expansive liquor laws Article 2B in legislative parlance and its tiered system of manufacturers, distributors, and retailers is unlikely to change.
To assist in the performance of its duties, Article 2B of the New Decree provides that the New Judicial Committee may do any of the following without limitation:
Eventually, drafters focused on a standalone Article, and the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) and American Law Institute (ALI) worked for a number of years on a new Article 2B that would be incorporated into the UCC.
The Coreper talks are being convened to take the temperature of opinion on the latest Spanish EU Presidency compromise, dated 1 March, which leaves it up to member states to apply the opt-outs (Article 2b).
Uniform Computer Information Transaction Act, or proposed Article 2B to the UCC ("UGC Article 2B"), is aimed at providing legal coverage tailored specifically to the information technology industry.
In the early 1990s, in response to complaints by software vendors that their products were not fully protected under existing state commercial law and federal copyright statutes, the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) and the American Law Institute (ALI) began drafting Article 2B, a new article of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC).
Originally known as proposed Article 2B, the drafters revised the Act, although much of the terminology remains the same.
(UCC Article 2B can be accessed at www.law.uh.edu/ucc2b/080198/080198.
The National Conference of Commissions on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) in July voted to promulgate the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA), formerly the Article 2B amendment of the Uniform Commercial Code.
The National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) and the American Law Institute (ALT) have announced that legal rules for computer information transactions will not he published as Article 2B of the Uniform Commercial Code, but the NCCUSL will publish the rules for adoption by states as the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act.
MCA Records on merchandise and character licensing; the validation of mass-market software licenses by Article 2B; determining royalty rates for technology; defining ownership in patent licensing agreements; taxes; and, enforcement of international agreements.
Article 2b - exemptions: renamed "optional exemptions"