articled

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articled

bound by a written contract, such as one that governs a period of training
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Having grown up in a council house in Shropshire - where his father was a fitter for Rolls-Royce - Parker started working life as a "pound a week" articled clerk.
BACK in the 1970s, when I was a solicitor's articled clerk, I and a friend used to meet regularly in the "Quebec" public house in Cardiff, with brilliant jazz from the Icon Jazzmen twice a week.
In 1961, with brother Michael due to take the reins of the family's dairy unit, John left school at 16 and found work as a pounds 2-a-week articled clerk with Morris Marshall & Poole.
He graduated BA, LLB from the University of Sydney, and later worked for the Public Service Association and as an articled clerk.
Her business currently accommodates 13 staff members, three of which are admitted lawyers and one articled clerk.
Wilkins Micawber was modelled on his own father John, for example, while the ghastly Uriah Heep echoed Dickens' time as an articled clerk.
Responsibility: Buryborn estate agent articled clerk, he formed Peel in 1982 and has built a UK-wide multi-billion pound property company that owns Liverpool John Lennon airport, Mersey Docks and Harbour Company and unveiled ambitious pounds 10bn development plans for derelict Liverpool and Wirral docklands.
She was previously employed as an articled clerk at Perth law firm Butcher Paull & Calder and is looking forward to the diversity of work in her new position, which includes legal research, lobbying government and organising seminars in relation to copyright law.
As an articled clerk to a firm of chartered accountants many moons ago (when I had a real job) I had to audit companies.
In Bradford, one famous hostelry was described as regularly frequented on Sunday evening by a range of male middle-class individuals, including a town councillor, an articled clerk, lawyer, architect, artist, "a wool merchant with a taste for the drama, a draper with a taste for a bottle of stout and a commission agent with a taste for music," mixing with music-hall entertainers, cricket and footballing players and vocalists, some 'fresh from churches and chapels', having "listened attentively to the sermon which has been preached.