Articles of Confederation


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Articles of Confederation

 

the first constitution of the USA. Ratified in November 1777, the Articles of Confederation served as the basis of American government from 1781 to 1789. They consolidated the conquests of the American Revolution (1775–83) and established a republican form of government in the former English colonies of North America, proclaiming a confederation and an eternal union of states.

References in periodicals archive ?
103, 108 (1998) (arguing that the Articles of Confederation had been unable to stem disruptive protectionism among the several states, thus threatening the life of the infant republic).
If the "Union" under the Articles of Confederation were already a nation-state, albeit a decentralized one, it would have made no sense for Madison, Hamilton, and Jay to warn against disunion if the federal constitution were not adopted.
After declaring its, independence, the nation was governed by the Articles of Confederation. Earlier, in 1754, the Albany Plan of Union, a document intended to unite the colonies, had been drawn up.
By the time the 13 original American states were formally joined within the Articles of Confederation, they had existed for over a century and a half and had long been in geographic community with one another.
Now when Wilson put his mind to defending the constitutionality of a national bank under the Articles of Confederation, he faced long odds.
'The European Union's fate is sealed,' Charles Ortel, a Wall Street analyst, investor and writer told Sputnik, drawing parallels with America's Articles of Confederation that operated from 1782 through 1789.
Within the (extensive) confines of this single volume, Klarman covers the political conflicts that arose at the end of the Revolutionary War (e.g., navigation rights on the Mississippi River, the states' inflationary policies of paper money and debtor-relief laws, the loose and fragile confederation of states under the Articles of Confederation, and the national government's impotence in creating and implementing national policies, among others) and demonstrates how well-known and obscure public figures responded to these conflicts.
Luther Martin was one of those who feared the replacement of the Articles of Confederation with a document that, in his opinion, gave far too much power to the federal government.
Full-text sources include the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution of the United States, the Bill of Rights and later Amendments, and other writings in various genres.
(10) Without the veto of the impost proposals offered under the Articles of Confederation, it is fair speculation, although counterfactual, that the Constitution would not have proposed nor adopted such a measure.
In addition to the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights and later amendments, primary documents include position papers and arguments for and against federalism.
Constitution replaced the much weaker Articles of Confederation, a political predecessor when it was finally ratified by all 13 states in 1790.