working memory

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working memory

(storage, architecture)
The parts of main memory (RAM) currently in use.

In a production system, working memory contains the facts, both initial and generated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Articulatory suppression abolished language differences for constant bilinguals and impaired digit span for both languages significantly for compound bilinguals.
Articulatory suppression. The subject repeatedly spoke aloud the word 'go' in time with the metronome.
Barron & Baron (1977) studied the effect of articulatory suppression on rhyme judgements in children aged from 6 to 13.
[19] investigated typical adults to examine the relation between inner speech and the LHT using the dual task paradigm, for which articulatory suppression and spatial suppression were conducted as secondary tasks.
A numerical sequence was presented at the beginning of each trial to start the articulatory suppression for 1000 ms; three colored shapes were subsequently and simultaneously presented for 900 ms followed by a 900 ms retention interval.
When the DVN was presented during the whole trial it began after the presentation of articulatory suppression digits.
If this hypothesis is correct, articulatory suppression should disrupt the recall of landmarks in the survey perspective.
These secondary tasks were articulatory suppression (continuously repeating the word 'de', the Dutch equivalent of 'the', about two to three times per second), matrix-tapping (hitting the four corners of the numeric keypad in counterclockwise order at a pace of two to three keys per second), random-interval generation (hitting the zero key of the numeric keypad to form an unpredictable sequence of inter-tap intervals at an average of one key press every second), and fixed-interval generation (hitting the zero key of the numeric keypad to produce inter-tap intervals of about 1 s).
For example, Gilhooly, Logie, Wetherick, and Wynn (1993) demonstrated that secondary tasks such as articulatory suppression and spatial tapping, assumed to draw on the resources of the PL and VSSP, respectively, did not disrupt syllogistic reasoning performances.
One line of support for the PL model comes from those studies that have demonstrated the non-additivity of the effects of articulatory suppression and irrelevant speech.
The purpose of Expt 2 was firstly, to confirm the results obtained in Expt 1, and secondly to investigate the effect of concurrent articulatory suppression on serial report of visual patterns.
The articulatory suppression would simply serve to prevent visual information from entering the phonological store.