Arveragus

Arveragus

delivers wife to adulterer to keep promise. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “The Franklin’s Tale”]
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heigh kynrede" (FranT, 1.735), consents to marry Arveragus, a man of inferior social status, but who has served his lady "in his beste wise" (1.730).
[67] Aurelius, seeking the connivance of a magician to secure the love of Dorigen, who is distraught at the absence of her husband Arveragus, finds the treacherous clerk of Orleans with an eerie foreknowledge of the dilemma.
In the event, Lipton's reading is not very different from previous efforts, though with some odd emphases, such as asserting that Arveragus keeps his and his wife's love secret, and stressing 'the violence of his threat to Dorigen' (p.
(30) Arveragus's departure in quest of adventure is thus Chaucer's addition to the Franklin's Tale in much the same way that the Knight's allusion to Arcite's hypothetical "aventure" subtly adds to Chaucer's source for that story.
The surprising shift from Arveragus and Dorigen's marriage to the relations between the three men at the end of the "Franklin's Tale" provides a good starting point for the argument that marriage is being used to discuss social relations in medieval literature.
married relation of Arveragus and Dorigen in the Franklin's Tale (F
In "The Frankelyn's Tale," these lines are spoken by Dorigen, ill-fated wife of Arveragus, upon learning that her young suitor Aurelius has indeed made the rocks along the shore of Brittany disappear.
Each partner wishes to please the other, both speakers assume obligations--with Arveragus promising never to be jealous and to obey Dorigen in every way, providing that she agree to a public representation of his role as master, and with Dorigen promising never to cause, by any of her actions, disagreements between them.
The Franklin begins by describing the marriage of a knight named Arveragus and his beautiful wife, Dorigen, who live on the rocky coast of Brittany.
The tale told by the Franklin centers upon the narrative motif of the "rash promise." While her husband Arveragus is away, Dorigen is assiduously courted by a squire, Aurelius.
It tells of the faithful love of Arveragus and his wife Dorigen.