Microtinae

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Microtinae

[mī′krät·ən‚ē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A subfamily of rodents in the family Muridae that includes lemmings and muskrats.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Microtinae

 

a subfamily of rodents of the family Cricetidae; some zoologists place the rodents in a separate family. The average body length is 10–12 cm (sometimes as long as 36 cm); the tail is half as long as the body (sometimes shorter). The upper-part of the body is usually solid gray or brown. The cheek teeth of most species are rootless and ever-growing. Only a few extant species and most fossil forms have cheek teeth with roots. The chewing surface of the teeth is prismatic.

There are more than 40 genera of microtines, more than half of which are extinct. The USSR has 12 extant genera, with 43 species. In the northern hemisphere they inhabit the continents and many islands south to northern Africa. The animals also dwell in northern India, Japan, the Kuril and Komandorskie islands, and northern Mexico. They live in the mountains to elevations having no vegetation. In the north, microtines are even found in coastal regions. The greatest diversity of species and the largest number of individuals are found in the open terrain of the temperate zone. Most microtines settle in colonies. They are active year-round, feeding primarily on the above-ground parts of plants. Some species hoard food. The animals reproduce throughout the warm periods of the year, and some species reproduce even in the winter. The number of microtines may vary sharply from year to year. Most species are serious pests of agricultural crops and are natural carriers of the organisms causing tularemia, leptospirosis, and other diseases. The skins of large species, for example, muskrats, are used in the manufacture of fur goods.

I. M. GROMOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
2010: Molecular phylogeny and evolution of the Asian lineage of vole genus Microtus (Arvicolinae, Rodentia) inferred from mitochondrial cytb sequence.
Year 2008 2009 2010 Total Talpidae Scalopus aguaticus 1 1 1 3 Soricidae Blarina brevicauda 14 5 0 19 Sorex cinereus 8 2 0 10 Cricetidae: Arvicolinae Microtus ochrogaster 0 48 14 62 Microtus pennsylvanicus 0 32 27 59 Cricetidae: Neotominae Peromyscus leucopus 7 54 4 65 Peromyscus maniculatus 0 5 26 31 Reithrodontomys 0 10 3 13 megalotis Muridae Mus musculus 0 2 2 4 Dipodidae Zapus hudsonius 1 1 21 23 Sciuridae Tamias striatus 1 0 0 1 Total 32 160 98 290 Trap-nights 1211 2924 2985 7120 Captures/trap-night 0.026 0.055 0.033 0.041 Table 2.--Total mist net captures of 10 bat species on the IAA conservation lands between 1997 and 2010.
2012: Systematics of snow voles (Chionomys, Arvicolinae) revisited.
Sigmodon- tinae, Cricetinae, Arvicolinae, Tylomyinae y Neotominae).
Morphological convergence and coexistence in three sympatric North American species of Microtus (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).
Muridae: Arvicolinae (voles).--Counting the muskrat, all five species of voles of Indiana occur at Willow Slough.
A third group of hantaviruses is associated with voles (subfamily Arvicolinae) throughout the northe rn hemisphere.
We interpret large measurement correlations with toothwear as evidence for postweaning growth, and we note that differences of magnitude of toothwear correlations among measurement variables within samples are broadly consistent with well documented patterns of relative growth in the muroid head skeleton: dimensions of the incisors and facial skeleton usually continue to increase well beyond weaning, whereas the neurocranium completes growth early in postnatal life; except in the subfamily Arvicolinae (which is not represented here), muroid molars do not grow once they have erupted (for a review of muroid cranial growth studies, see Voss, 1988: pp.
In Finland, it was shown that Arvicolinae move rather under the snow cover, which makes them more difficult to hunt in case of the cover's larger thickness, whereas Murinae are being found rather above the snow, which usually makes them easier to hunt (Halonen et al.
These results confirm those of previous studies (14,15), which detected antibodies against LCMV in rodent species of the subfamily Arvicolinae. Additional arenaviruses may be present in Europe.
If only a group (e.g., voles or rodents) is mentioned, then the appropriate scientific group name should be provided (e.g., Arvicolinae or Rodentia).
maniculatus (Wagner), deer mouse I Reithrodontomys megalotis I (Baird), western harvestmouse Subfamily Arvicolinae Microtus ochroguster (Wagner), I prairie vole M.