arytenoid

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Related to Arytenoids: corniculate, larynx

arytenoid

[‚ar·ə′tē‚nȯid]
(anatomy)
Relating to either of the paired, pyramid-shaped, pivoting cartilages on the dorsal aspect of the larynx, in humans and most other mammals, to which the vocal cords and arytenoid muscles are attached.
References in periodicals archive ?
Traction of lateral cricoarytenoid muscle for unilateral vocal fold paralysis: Comparison with Isshiki' s original technique of arytenoid adduction.
Dislocation of the arytenoids can cause alterations of the voice, sore throat and pain on swallowing.
In this case the involved site is the epiglottis, arytenoids and interarytenoid area and the patient gives the history of progressive hoarseness and odynophagia of 6 months' duration along with the history of weight loss and loss of appetite; investigation showed normal chest radiograph and negative sputum for acid bacilli in ZN staining; this led us to suspect supraglottic malignancy but histopathological findings showed tubercular granuloma and the symptoms subsided with anti-tubercular drugs, so laryngeal malignancy is ruled out.
Hence, in the prevention of anterior subluxation, it would seem logical that good visualisation of the laryngeal inlet including the position of the arytenoids is important prior to instrumentation of the airway.
She subsequently reported to an emergency department, where computed tomography (CT) demonstrated soft-tissue edema without laryngeal pathology or arytenoid cartilage dislocation.
The arytenoids were definitely covering the folds in a far more severe way during the music theater and gospel styles than during the classical style.
There was resistance at the level of the vocal cords or the arytenoids.
An ulcero-proliferative, granulomatous lesion was generally found on the posterior part of the larynx due to accumulation of sputum in arytenoids region in bed-bound patients.
The redundancy was much worse on the left, and the tissue in the arytenoids region prolapsed into the glottis.
It usually results from anatomical and technical problems, which include obstruction by laryngeal and pharyngeal structures such as down-folding of the epiglottis, obstruction by the arytenoids and saliva, as well as secretions obscuring the surface of the lens.
All the patients had lesions in the larynx and only 1/3rd of the patients had lesions in the trachea may be due to low volume high pressure cuffs in the trachea and unyielding walls of the tube exerting constant pressure on the vocal cords, arytenoids and subglottic region.