Aschaffenburg


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Aschaffenburg

(äshä`fənbo͝ork), city (1994 pop. 65,650), Bavaria, S central Germany, on the Main River. Its manufactures include clothing, machine and precision instruments, and colored paper. Once the location of a Roman garrison and later of a Frankish castle, Aschaffenburg passed to the archbishopric of Mainz in the 10th cent. The imperial diet met there in 1474. It changed hands several times during the Thirty Years War (1618–48) and was stormed in 1672 by the French marshal Henri Turenne. It passed to Bavaria in 1814. Noteworthy buildings include a 12th-century church and a 17th-century castle.
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Aschaffenburg

a city in Germany, on the River Main in Bavaria: seat of the Imperial Diet (1447); ceded to Bavaria in 1814. Pop.: 68 607 (2003 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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The Aschaffenburg office, headed by Christian Lbchler, regional sales manager, will have full access to Flexicon's engineering resources, including more than 20,000 installations of Flexicon bulk handling equipment and engineered systems worldwide.
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The company has been manufacturing forklift trucks at its Aschaffenburg site since 1958.
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When Jewish professors like Aschaffenburg and Birnbaum were removed from their posts soon after Hitler assumed power, Hans von Hentig resigned from his coeditorship of Germany's leading criminological journal in protest and F ranz Exner and other non-Nazis took over his and Aschaffenburg's editorial duties and saw to it that the journal remained respectable.