Ascham


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Ascham

Roger. ?1515--68, English humanist writer and classical scholar: tutor to Queen Elizabeth I
References in periodicals archive ?
(5.) Ascham's phrase points to larger conflicts between those in favor of and against Italian influences.
Several of Ascham's (1515/16-68) English works are well known to scholars of English history and literature, says Nicholas, but his theological works in Latin have received little scholarly attention.
Ascham defende tambem o respeito ao leitor em todos os sentidos.
One need only glance at the educational or rhetorical works of an Eliot, Ascham, or Puttenham to appreciate the value placed on linguistic diversity, and the pages of university wits like Nashe, Harvey, and Greene are awash with interlineated wisdom from a variety of languages, from the classical to the contemporary.
(3) Roger Ascham, Toxophilus: The Schole of Shoting, in English Works, ed.
What principles do the most significant guides establish for the ars epistolica; what creedal differences are actually reflected in the various guides; how would an English schoolboy studying Roger Ascham produce a letter that differed from a German schoolboy studying Johann Sturm; etc.
She describes the use of English in Thomas Elyot's Boke named the Governour and Roger Ascham's Scholemaster that were based on the theories of humanism; the division between allegiance to home and the attraction to the remote and alien, with the example of Thomas Wilson's Arte of Rhetorique; the style of John Lyly in Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit; Edmund Spenser's efforts to invent a poetic diction in The Shepheardes Calendar; and the problem of how to set limits for poetic expression, as seen in Christopher Marlowe's Tamburlaine the Great.
In the case particularly of the Morte, he does seek to enunciate a reception history that demonstrates how anti-Catholic sentiments led some readers, such as Roger Ascham and Nathaniel Baxter, to denigrate the poems "mystical Eucharistic symbolism" (121).
Both Stoker and Berry reference a letter written by one of Elizabeth's tutors - a Roger Ascham - who wrote to a Rector at the Protestant University in Strasbourg: "The constitution of her mind is exempt from female weakness, and she is endued with a masculine power of application."
Humanist texts of the early modern period by Vives, Elyot, Ascham, and others argued for their education, but uneasily, aware that women must display their learning only in the spheres proper to their gender: the running of households and the rearing of Christian boys and girls who exhibit excellence in their own proper spheres.
Roger Ascham, the private tutor to Elizabeth I before she became queen, specified in his The Scholemaster, published in 1591, the way to study the classical texts: the reading of a Greek author was compared --following Quintilian's method of comparison--to his Roman version in genre, for example, Homer to Virgil in epic, or Thucydides to Sallust in history, or Plato to Cicero in moral philosophy.
More widespread, though, was the criticism of 'confusion', as in the extremely influential Scholemaster (1570) by Roger Ascham: "The confounding of companies, breedeth confusion of good manners both in the Courte, and euerie where else" (1570: 24).