Ascham


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Ascham

Roger. ?1515--68, English humanist writer and classical scholar: tutor to Queen Elizabeth I
References in periodicals archive ?
Roger Ascham, The Scholemaster in The Whole Works of Roger Ascham ed.
5) While Ascham may have his reservations about Italian morals in particular, most educators encouraged travel for this very purpose.
Roger Ascham, the private tutor to Elizabeth I before she became queen, specified in his The Scholemaster, published in 1591, the way to study the classical texts: the reading of a Greek author was compared --following Quintilian's method of comparison--to his Roman version in genre, for example, Homer to Virgil in epic, or Thucydides to Sallust in history, or Plato to Cicero in moral philosophy.
By commenting on later poets, he populates the span of literary history between Chaucer's compositions and his own reading of them with notables such as Skelton, Hawes, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, and Ascham.
The first technical treatise to be written in the English language, rather than Latin, was Toxophilus by Roger Ascham (pronounced Ask-am) in 1544.
I worked at Ascham (a girl's school in Sydney) and he was coming once a week to conduct our Senior Choir.
Her clever cousin, Jane Grey, who studied with her under the tutor, Ascham, has lost her head.
Roger Ascham, to take one important Elizabethan pedagogue and writer featured in Redmond's fine analyses, warned of how "subtle and secret papists at home procured bawdy books to be translated out of the Italian tongue, whereby over many young will and wits, allured to wantonness, so now boldly contemn all severe books that sound to honesty and godliness" (Ascham quoted by Redmond 2009, 30).
A statement of the rhetorical similarities between Ascham's and Hooper's strategies might go something like this: Just as Ascham used his defense and celebration of archery to display his great wealth of formal erudition, demonstrating his accomplishments as writer and rhetorician, and aligning himself with Henry VIII by celebrating one of the king's favorite prejudices, so might Hooper also have been courting the favorable public opinion of his peers and superiors generally, instead of the patronage of a single, exalted personage in particular.
Though Porter points out that Katherine's 'advisers spanned the religious divide; all those she names as tutors to the royal children, beginning with Sir Richard Cox, were squarely behind the movement of religious reform in England, including not only Sir John Cheke and Roger Ascham of Cambridge but also Sir Anthony Cooke, whose reform-minded daughters Anne and Mildred went on to marry the two prime movers of the religious policy of Elizabeth I, Sir Nicholas Bacon (father of Sir Francis) and Sir William Cecil.
only the children offered the special mixture of pertness and naivety, audacity and innocence, which Roger Ascham felt was overly prized in upper-class English families.