Cinderella

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Cinderella,

heroine of one of the most famous folktales in the world. She is rescued from a life of drudgery by her fairy godmother and eventually marries a handsome prince. The story (dating back to 9th-century China) exists in 500 versions in Europe alone; it was included by both Charles PerraultPerrault, Charles
, 1628–1703, French poet. His collections of eight fairy tales, Histoires ou contes du temps passé [stories or tales of olden times] (1697) gave classic form to the traditional stories of Bluebeard, Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella, Puss in
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 and the GrimmGrimm, Jakob
, 1785–1863, German philologist and folklorist, a founder of comparative philology. His interest in the relationship among Germanic languages led to his formulation of Grimm's law. His German grammar (1819–37) and his German Mythology (1835, tr.
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 brothers in their collections of tales.
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Cinderella

enchantment lasts only till midnight. [Fr. Fairy Tale: Cinderella]

Cinderella

feeds beggar whom sisters scorn. [Ital. Opera: Rossini, Cinderella, Westerman, 120–121]

Cinderella

with fairy godmother’s aid, poor maligned girl wins prince’s heart. [Fr. Fairy Tale: Cinderella]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
dress on the first time, but the second time, Aschenputtel puts it on
It's the contrast between Aschenputtel's miserable "ashen" existence during the week and her glorious, glamorous few hours (until midnight) Saturday evening that makes the happy ending that much happier.
For those of you who have not read the German version of Cinderella ("Aschenputtel"), or a good translation thereof, here's what the nineteenth-century philologists, those Brothers Grimm, tell us the wicked stepsisters do in order to fit their large feet into the small slipper: the oldest can't get her toes in, so their mother tells her, "Hau die Zehe ab!
The well-known Disney animated film relies on Perrault's cleaned-up version of the tale, along with a bit of the Grimm Brothers' "Aschenputtel" in the form of the wicked stepsisters.