Asclepius


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Asclepius

(ăsklē`pēəs), Lat. Aesculapius (ĕs'kəlā`pēəs), legendary Greek physician; son of Apollo and Coronis. His first teacher was the wise centaur Chiron. When he became so skillful in healing that he could revive the dead, Zeus killed him. Apollo persuaded Zeus to make Asclepius the god of medicine. The worship of Asclepius is believed to have originated in Thessaly. Temples were built to him at Epidaurus, Cos, Pergamum, and later Rome, where his worship spread after a plague in 293 B.C. Treatments, including massage and baths, were given to the sick. The serpent and the cock were sacred to Asclepius. People who claimed descent from him and those who followed his teachings were known as Asclepiads.

Bibliography

See E. J. Edelstein, Asclepius (1945, repr. 1988); S. B. Aleshire, The Athenian Asklepieion (1989).

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Asclepius

saved by his father Apollo from the body of pregnant Coronis when Apollo slays her for infidelity. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 57]

Asclepius

(Aesculapius) god of healing. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 37]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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"I swear by Apollo Physician and Asclepius and Hygieia and Panaceia and all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will fulfill according to my ability and judgment this oath and this covenant:
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Solidly entertaining, the short stories featured are Hue and Cry; La Tristesse Des Herissons; Strings; Limerence; The Rod of Asclepius; Sharing the Hostage; Paracosmos; and the title story Einstein's Beach House.
I begin to sing of Asclepius, son of Apollo and healer of sicknesses.
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