Ascraeus Mons

(redirected from Ascraeus)

Ascraeus Mons

(ass-kree -ŭs) A 19-km-high volcano on the Tharsis Ridge of Mars, located at the areographic coordinates 11.9° N latitude, 104.5° W longitude (see areography). It is 400 km wide at its base and has a summit caldera 50 km across. See Mars, volcanoes.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The southernmost member of this group of shield volcanoes is called Arsia Mons (the other two being Ascraeus Mons and Pavonis Mons).
That would make Mars's giant mid-latitude mountains -- Ascraeus Mons, Pavonis Mons and Arsia Mons.
The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter found the heart-shape on the south of the huge shield volcano Ascraeus Mons which measures approximately 200 meters across, Discovery News reported.
Morning clouds and frost can sometimes settle in the broad, low plains of this region, making the giant Tharsis volcanoes Arsia Mons, Pavonis Mons, and Ascraeus Mons, as well as nearby Olympus Mons, appear as dark spots above the bright plains.
of Noctis Lacus or Syria Planum (aka Nox Lux), and over Arsia Mons in the south and Lunae Lacus and Ascraeus Mons in the north, the martian 'W' cloud is formed.
600 km diameter, heights up to >20 km) shield volcanoes (Olympus Mons, Ascraeus Mons, Pavonis Mons, and Arsia Mons) with the same general morphology as basaltic shield volcanoes found on Earth (Fig.
Estienne made a similarly uncompromising decision when he chose that the first text his reader would encounter on turning the title-page of the Thesaurus would be a poem by himself, in Greek, starting with a reference to a certain Ascraeus: "`The tongue's best treasure,' Ascraeus said.
Combined with the varying height of the volcanoes, we can say that Arsia Mons is the oldest, then Pavonis Mons formed and finally Ascraeus Mons," said Mikael Beuthe of the Royal Observatory of Belgium and lead author of the paper.
of Noctis Lacus (Syria Planum, 'Nox Lux') and Arsia Mons in the south and Lunae Lacus and Ascraeus Mons in the north can join to form the streaks of the martian 'W' cloud.
In mid-November 2009, during early northern spring, observers detected bright clouds over the four great volcanoes of the Tharsis Bulge: Olympus Mons, Ascraeus Mons, Pavonis Mons, and Arsia Mons.
Under excellent conditions the volcanoes appeared as reddish patches in the 2005 Aug-Oct pre-opposition images, especially Olympus Mons and Ascraeus Mons.