Asenath

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Asenath

(ăs`ənăth), in the Bible, Poti-phera's daughter, the Egyptian wife of Joseph, mother of Manasseh and Ephraim. Her betrothal to Joseph and conversion to Judaism are the subject of Joseph and Asenath, one of the Old Testament PseudepigraphaPseudepigrapha
[Gr.,=things falsely ascribed], a collection of early Jewish and some Jewish-Christian writings composed between c.200 B.C. and c.A.D. 200, not found in the Bible or rabbinic writings.
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References in periodicals archive ?
So, for instance, Virginia Burrus' recent article presupposes that both the Greek novels and the apocryphal Acts were resistance literature as she seeks to "explore commonalities of colonial resistance enacted across the genre," using as test cases Kleitophon and Leukippe, an Ethiopian Story, Joseph and Aseneth, and the Acts of Paul and Thecla.
Instead, the document is actually named "The Story of Joseph and Aseneth", and far from being 'lost' it has been resident in the British Museum where hundreds of scholars have studied it over more than a hundred years.
According to the Bible, once Joseph rises to prominence, he marries a local woman, Aseneth, the daughter of Potiphera, the priest.
Like the other South German Anabaptists, Marpeck and the Austerlitz Brethren held fast to the traditional canon of the Vulgate; indeed, reaching beyond the deutero-canonical writings, they regarded even the apocryphal Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs and Joseph and Aseneth as inspired writings.
Allen (2D), Hannah Lewis (3F), and Aseneth Hyeth (4E).
The authors said the manuscript is in code, hence the alleged marriage of Jesus to Mary Magdalene was told through the Old Testament character Joseph and his wife Aseneth. They said the couple was married by the Pharaoh of Egypt, Joseph's former master, and one of their bases that they were Jesus and Mary Magdalene is the pharaoh's blessings which reads: "Blessed are you by the Lord God of Joseph, because he is the first-born of God, and you will be called the Daughter of God Most High and the bride of Joseph now and for ever."
Desiring Conversion: Hermas, Thecla, Aseneth. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
Junto a la obra de Filon, podemos simar otras que, sin embargo, tienen un origen muy diverso, tanto desde el punto de vista de su ambiente conceptual como geografico: el libro de la Sabiduria, Jose y Aseneth, la Carta de Aristeas, etc.
Unsurprisingly, apocalyptic literature (1 Enoch, Sibylline Oracles, Psalms of Solomon, 2 Baruch) falls mostly under the category of eschatological participation, while apologetic works tend to display sympathization, conversion, and ethical monotheism (Letter of Aristeas, Joseph and Aseneth).
If we recall the stories of Joseph and Aseneth, Paul and Thelca, and the Martyrdom of Perpetua; the disciples Maximilla (in the Acts of Andrew), Mygdonia (in the Acts of Thomas), and Charitine (in the Acts of Philip); and Jesus' teaching, as found in the Gospel of Thomas regarding Mary, (57) we can clearly see that transcendence is, in fact, a 'virilization.' (58) The women in these stories renounce their femaleness and become male--through hair-cutting, clothing exchange, celibacy, rejection of maternity, and so forth--and in doing so, move 'to a higher state of virtue.' (59) The social hierarchy that is supplanted by a spiritual androgyny is indeed a return to the original Adam.
This revised 1996 dissertation, directed by Erich Gruen at the University of California, Berkeley, deftly dismantles the tendency to aggregate 2 and 3 Maccabees, the Letter of Aristeas, Greek Esther, Daniel (plus the Additions), Judith, Tobit, materials from Josephus's Antiquities, the fragments of Artapanus, and Joseph and Aseneth into the genre of "Hellenistic novel" or "romance." Instead, Sara Raup Johnson seeks to demonstrate how these "quasi-fictional Jewish texts" (xiii) or "historical fictions" (2) are united not by genre but by a shared attitude toward the use of the past.