asexual

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asexual

1. having no apparent sex or sex organs
2. (of reproduction) not involving the fusion of male and female gametes, as in vegetative reproduction, fission, or budding

asexual

[ā′seksh·ə·wəl]
(biology)
Not involving sex.
Exhibiting absence of sex or of functional sex organs.
References in periodicals archive ?
He added: "We have meet-ups and these are vital for older asexuals who have spent their lives trying to fit into other people's ideals.
burgeoning community of self-identified asexuals, and then develops an
Regardless of the intentions of anyone who adopts it, the never-having-experienced-sexual-attraction definition of asexuality implicitly divides people who do not experience sexual desire into two categories: asexuals who have always been without sexual desire and who are therefore happily free of sexual desire and non-asexual people who, for some reason, lose their sexual desire and are therefore in distress.
Asexuals may not be interested in sex but can be good lovers.
In theory, that should help sexual populations maintain stability, while asexual populations face extinction at the hands of parasites.
They reported in 2000 that the two copies of the gene in the asexual species differ from each far more than do copies of genes in rotifers that evolved with sexual reproduction (SN: 5/20/00, p.
The world has become so sexual-minded that it almost seems you should be ashamed to be asexual.
The main criticism of the cost-of-males idea is that sexual and asexual lineages, although of common origin, may inherently show different fecundities (and life histories, in general) due to factors directly related to asexuality.
It has traditionally been assumed that asexuals have simply been relegated to such "marginal" habitats due to the competitive superiority of sexuals (Lynch, 1984).
An asexual is less likely a biological variant than someone who has been subjected to formidable environmental influences that prevent expression of natural biological urges.
The lines from Dan Savage in the epigraph, though comic, contain a serious claim: Savage implies that asexuals don't need anything from the law.
Sexy individuals, such as male guppies with bright spots or male frogs with loud croaks, can attract large numbers of mates, and they produce many more offspring than would be possible through asexual reproduction.