Ashendene Press


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Ashendene Press

Ashendene Press (ăshˌəndēnˈ), founded in 1895 at Ashendene, Hertfordshire, England, by Sir C. H. St. John Hornby and moved in 1899 to Chelsea, London. It was a leader (with the Kelmscott Press and the Doves Press) in the 19th-century revival of fine English printing. Its edition of Dante (1909) is considered an achievement comparable to the Kelmscott Chaucer of William Morris. The Subiaco type used by the Ashendene Press was designed by Sir Emery Walker and S. C. Cockerell from an early Italian typeface. The Ashendene Press, which set all of its editions by hand, issued 40 books in the years from 1895 to 1915 and from 1920 to 1935.

Bibliography

See W. Ransom, Kelmscott, Doves, and Ashendene (1952).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
John Hornby of the Ashendene Press and got the superbly English response that Hornby couldn't help him because he never had a problem with vellum.
But the Curwen Press always led the way with skilled technology based upon the values the 19th Century had developed from the concepts of William Morris and St John Hornby (at the Ashendene Press) which, along with the outstanding calligraphy of Edward Johnston and the input of Emery Walker gave to the 1920s and 1930s a sense of aesthetic freedom.
But the Curwen Press always led the way with skilled technology based upon the values the 19th century had developed from the concepts of William Morris, St John Hornby (at the Ashendene Press) which, along with the outstanding calligraphy of Edward Johnston and the input of Emery Walker gave to the 20s and 30s a sense aesthetic freedom.
A good editor would have caught the misspellings, spacing errors, awkward phrasings, errors in terminology such as "unseen laid lines" (52) and "turnover" for the stub of a cancel (55-6), and missing footnotes (for the section on the Ashendene Press, in chapter 2).
We are working and establishing a press which is intended to be for the most part similar to the Ashendene Press at London.
The Maggs catalogue, with its fine cover showing a binding made for the Doves Press ranges over some of the finest which ever came out of The Ashendene Press, The Golden Cockerel Press, The Kelmscott Press (William Morris, of course), The Nonesuch and Gwasg Gregynog.