Ashurnasirpal II


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Ashurnasirpal II

(ä`sho͝ornä`zĭrpäl), d. 860? B.C., king of ancient Assyria (884–860? B.C.), also called Ashurnazirpal II and Assurnasirbal II. One of the earliest of the Assyrian conquerors, he gained territory as far west as the Mediterranean. In initiating a system of installing Assyrian governors in conquered lands, Ashurnasirpal helped to create a centralized state. Excavations of the palace and temple built by Ashurnasirpal at CalahCalah
or Kalakh
, ancient city of Assyria, S of Nineveh and therefore S of present Mosul, Iraq. Known as Calah in the Bible, it is the same as the ancient Nimrud, named after a legendary Assyrian hunting hero.
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 revealed many bas-reliefs portraying the king's conquests in a narrative style. He was succeeded by his son Shalmaneser III.

Ashurnasirpal II

 

king of Assyria (883 to 859 B.C).

Ashurnasirpal conquered northern Mesopotamia, northern Syria, and Phoenicia. Bas-reliefs are known from the palace of Ashurnasirpal II in Calah (modern Nimrud); some of them are preserved in the State Hermitage (Leningrad).

References in periodicals archive ?
1) guarded entrances in the palace at Nimrud of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (r.
The Balawat Gates of Ashurnasirpal II. Edited by J.
Ancient art in the newly renovated Kim Gallery includes, along the left-hand wall, reliefs from the north-west palace of Ashurnasirpal II at Nimrud, 883-859 BC.
Indeed, even the monumental annals of Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BCE), originally carved on the floor and walls of the temple of the war-god Ninurta, on closer inspection appear to be a collection of "assorted texts joined together...
As the tally of eradication mounts--the Temple of Bel in Palmyra, the Northwest Palace of the Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud, the Mosque of the Prophet Jonah in Nineveh, the ancient city of Hatra, fourteen of the mausoleums of Timbuktu, all in the past ten years--it has become clear that the devastation is not random but is the result of programmatic cultural cleansing.
Nimrud (Iraq): The palace of Ashurnasirpal II, an Assyrian king, had survived for three millennia before Daesh militants arrived and sacked the place with glee.
Those statues included the famous winged bulls with human faces, known as lamassu, which stood at the entrances to the palace of Ashurnasirpal II, king of Assyria in the 9th century BC, and nearby temples on the site.
In approximately 850 BC, King Ashurnasirpal II of Assyria chose the city of Kalhu as his capital in place of Assur (Ashur), 30 km from present day Mosul.
Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (9th century BCE) received tribute that included "silver ...
palace built by the Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II, being (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/150414-why-islamic-state-destroyed-assyrian-palace-nimrud-iraq-video-isis-isil-archaeology/) bombed in an overall effort to destroy idols.
Many of them show battles and grisly punishment of rebels; others depict religious ceremonies performed by the king of the time, such as Ashurnasirpal II, whose magnetite statue towers in the show.
One of the most famous Assyrian kings was Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BCE), represented in the exhibition by a statue made of magnesite.