Asian flu


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Related to Asian flu: Asiatic flu

Asian flu

[′āzh·ən ′flü]
(medicine)
An acute viral respiratory infection of humans caused by influenza A-2 virus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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From about 19 cement companies prior to the Asian Flu, the industry now has nine players, with Holcim leading the pack, accounting for about 35 percent of the market.
The 1957-58 Asian flu killed 70,000 Americans, while the 1968-69 Hong Kong flu killed more than 34,000 in the U.S.
Our understanding of them comes mainly from data and information obtained from studying four events over the past 120 years: the 1889 "Russian Flu" pandemic, the 1918 "Spanish Flu," the 1957 "Asian Flu" and the 1968 "Hong Kong Flu."
"No other group in the world takes H5N1 Asian flu infected chickens, brings them to Europe, extracts their DNA, combines their proteins with H1N1 viruses from the 1918 Spanish flu isolate, additionally mixes in swine flu genes from pigs, then 'reverse engineers' them to infect humans," he added.
"It's likely older adults have been exposed to a strain of this virus in 1957, during Asian flu pandemic, so they may have developed some resistance," explains Dr.
That's because people over 60 probably have some immunity to H1N1, probably because they were exposed to it before 1957, when Asian flu became the dominant influenza, Cieslak said.
Himself a victim of the 1950s Asian Flu epidemic, he said farmers had more pressing concerns - like today's forecasted rain.
It was followed by the Asian Flu in 1957 with up to 4 million deaths, and the Hong Kong Flu in 1968 resulting in about 1 million deaths.
This was not so with the Hong Kong flu pandemic of 1968-69 which killed 1.4 million people and the 'wild ducks' Asian flu of 1957 which led to the deaths of around ten times that number.
THERE have been three in the past 100 years - Hong Kong flu in 1968, Asian flu in 1957 and Spanish flu of 1918.
B Collins, Sheerness, Kent THE swine flu outbreak reminds me of the Asian Flu epidemic of 1957.
Flying flu came two years after Asian flu, which was estimated to have killed nearly 4,000 people in Britain.

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