Asian flu


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Asian flu: Asiatic flu

Asian flu

[′āzh·ən ′flü]
(medicine)
An acute viral respiratory infection of humans caused by influenza A-2 virus.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Federal Reserve rate hikes, contagion from China's financial market turmoil/yuan devaluation, collapse in oil prices (West Texas crude prices have fallen by a shocking 25 per cent since June) and commodities, weak banking systems, stagflation in Brazil and Russia, new political risks in Turkey and the Arab world, terrorist insurgencies in East and West Africa make 2015 the toughest macro environment for emerging markets since the Asian flu and Russian default in 1998.
The Asian flu is more lethal but the swine flu is more contagious, they can recombine and make a virus with both characteristics: lethal and contagious," he told Daily News Egypt.
It was followed by the Asian Flu in 1957 with up to 4 million deaths, and the Hong Kong Flu in 1968 resulting in about 1 million deaths.
4 million people and the 'wild ducks' Asian flu of 1957 which led to the deaths of around ten times that number.
THERE have been three in the past 100 years - Hong Kong flu in 1968, Asian flu in 1957 and Spanish flu of 1918.
B Collins, Sheerness, Kent THE swine flu outbreak reminds me of the Asian Flu epidemic of 1957.
Flying flu came two years after Asian flu, which was estimated to have killed nearly 4,000 people in Britain.
So it's swine flu this year, bird flu last year, following Asian flu the year before, and reading the Press or viewing Sky News, the end of the world is nigh.
The Asian flu was first identified in China in 1957.
Each of these 720 accounts of epidemics, including new materials on anthrax, asian flu, HIV/AIDS, mad cow disease, SARS, tuberculosis and the West Nile virus contains a lesson about how even diseases that are not always fatal can decimate whole nations.
The Asian Flu of 1958 caused 70,000 deaths in the United States, while the Hong Kong Flu of 1968 took another 34,000 Americans.
To that end, she represents the social construction of world-wide influenza outbreaks: 1918, the Asian Flu in 1957, and the Hong Kong Flu of 1968.

Full browser ?