Asiatic Wild Ass


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Asiatic Wild Ass

 

(Equus hemionus), an odd-toed ungulate of the family Equidae. The height at the shoulder is approximately 125 cm; the body measures about 2 m long. Its head is larger than that of the horse; it also has longer ears and more slender legs. The Asiatic wild ass has narrow hooves, the mane is short and stiff, and there is no forelock. Long coarse hair covers the lower third of the tail, forming a brush. The coloration is sandy yellow, with a dark streak along the spine. The brush of hair at the tip of the tail is black, and the legs and underparts are white.

The Asiatic wild ass is found in the deserts and semideserts of Southwest, Middle, and Central Asia. In the USSR it once inhabited the steppes of the Ukraine (including the Crimea), Transcaucasia, and Kazakhstan. Its numbers and range have sharply declined; today it is found only in the Badkhyz Preserve in southern Turkmenia. It lives in herds of three to 50 head and feeds on grasses and bushes. The Asiatic wild ass is able to drink salt water (from the Caspian Sea). It is a fast runner, reaching a speed of 70 km per hr. Mating occurs in the spring; the gestation period is 11 months. This species is protected in the USSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
Each sampled Asiatic wild ass was observed for 10 min.
The time Asiatic wild ass spent feeding was the lowest in summer (46.
As the two most important activities of Asiatic wild ass, feeding and resting had a covariance in all seasons.
In summer, peaks in moving time of Asiatic wild ass were noted at 8:00-9:00, 15:00-16:00 and 19:00-20:00 (Fig.
Our study demonstrated that Asiatic wild ass living in this area had similar distribution of activities to other subspecies in Inner Mongolia (Bi et al.
As a consequence, Asiatic wild ass was forced to spend more time feeding to satisfy their energy and nutrient requirements.
In winter, Asiatic wild ass spent longer time feeding because forage quantity decreased sharply due to snow cover and a high density of livestock in the study area (Xu et al.
During spring and autumn, temperatures were moderate which gave the Asiatic wild ass the possibility to graze most of the day.
Additionally, high temperatures are often positively correlated with an abundance of flies which force Asiatic wild ass to spend extra insect-repelling behaviors (tail whipping, body rolling or bathing in the dust etc.
Human activities and livestock overgrazing resulted in forage resources for Asiatic wild ass becoming particularly poor.