Asimov's laws

Asimov's laws

The famous author of science fiction Isaac Asimov (1920-1992) conceived three important principles pertaining to robots in the 1940s, known as "Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics." Ths first law is "a robot must never harm human beings or, through inaction, allow a human being to be harmed." The second law is "a robot must obey the orders from human beings except where such orders conflict with the first law," and the third law is "a robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the first and second laws." See laws.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barry Nolan, Editorial Board member of The Boston Global Forum put it this way, "The ultimate aim is to create a global consensus on an idea nicely summed by Rule Number One of what came to be call Asimov's Laws, created in 1942 by the great science fiction author and former professor of biochemistry at Boston University Isaac Asimov, 'A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
But his serious suggestions are motivational, to use his own term: Following Asimov's laws of robotics, one might install in the SI limited final goals, or try a set of goals out in a simpler, safer, system and then add into the full SI.
An author he might have looked to here is Thomas Schelling (1969), whose work on complex game-theoretic principles that might extend Asimov's laws take the form of constraints on what an entity must not do.
And if intelligent machines are a potential threat, is there some way of programming them that will, like Asimov's Laws, keep them subservient to human will?
Almost no one wants to relinquish that operation to an autonomous system, dating back to the first of Isaac Asimov's laws of robotics: "A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
Even robots designed to Asimov's laws can collide with people.
In all of these developments, none of Asimov's laws are being adhered to.
If Asimov's laws of robots were too idealistic and impractical to ever be followed in a real-world situation, perhaps they should be replaced with a set of laws that are practical and useful to the clients who purchase them.
Asimov's laws are iconic not only among engineers and science fiction enthusiasts, but the general public as well.
Sadly, the promise of robotics has not been fulfilled as rapidly as we had hoped: no need yet for Asimov's Laws of Robotics, alas.