Aspasia

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Aspasia

Aspasia (ăspāˈshə, –zhə), fl. mid-5th cent. B.C., Athenian courtesan. A woman of great beauty and intelligence, she became the mistress and, according to some poets, adviser of Pericles after he divorced (445 B.C.) his wife. She is the chief figure in Aspasia, a dialogue by Aeschines the Socratic, in which she criticizes the training of women. She also appears in the Menexnus, probably written by Plato, and in the writings of Xenophon, who wrote favorably of her.
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Aspasia

mistress of Pericles; byword for cultured courtesan. [Gk. Hist.: Benét, 58]

Aspasia

pathetic figure bearing fate with fortitude. [Br. Lit.: The Maid’s Tragedy]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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As she is described in Plato's Menexenus, for example, Aspasia of Miletus stands as a useful paradigm of postmodern theories of writing center administration.1 Although many of the historical details of her life have been lost, we do know that Aspasia was born in Miletus in the fifth century BCE and spent much of her life in Athens.