aspen

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Aspen

(ăs`pən), city (1990 pop. 5,049), alt. 7,850 ft (2,390 m), seat of Pitkin co., S central Colo., on the Roaring Fork River; founded c.1879 by silver prospectors, inc. 1881. Declining after an 1880s–90s boom, it was transformed in the 1930s into a ski resort. Affluent, cosmopolitan Aspen is now noted for its Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies and Aspen Music Festival and School (see Aspen Music FestivalAspen Music Festival,
classical music festival held annuallly each summer in Aspen, Colo. Chicagoans Walter and Elizabeth Paepcke established the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies (now the Aspen Institute) in the former silver-mining boomtown, and the Aspen Music Festival
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). The summer music festival was the progenitor (1949) of similar arts festivals throughout the mountain states. The Aspen Art Museum is housed in a building designed by Shigeru BanBan, Shigeru,
1957–, Japanese architect, known especially for temporary structures made from nonstandard building materials and built in response to environmental or societal disasters.
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.

aspen:

see willowwillow,
common name for some members of the Salicaceae, a family of deciduous trees and shrubs of worldwide distribution, especially abundant from north temperate to arctic areas.
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.
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aspen

aspen

related to Poplar Tree, also called “Quaking Aspen” for how it sways in the wind. Whitish bark, which contains salicylin, the natural aspirin also found in willow trees for pain relief and headaches. Inner bark tea used for colds, fever, pain, stomach problems, kidney, bladder, urinary issues, venereal disease, rheumatism, arthritis, diarrhea, worms, menstrual bleeding, anti-inflammatory.

aspen

[′as·pən]
(botany)
Any of several species of poplars (Populus) characterized by weak, flattened leaf stalks which cause the leaves to flutter in the slightest breeze.

aspen

any of several trees of the salicaceous genus Populus, such as P. tremula of Europe, in which the leaves are attached to the stem by long flattened stalks so that they quiver in the wind

ASPEN

(language)
A toy language for teaching compiler construction.

["ASPEN Language Specifications", T.R. Wilcox, SIGPLAN Notices 12(11):70-87, Nov 1977].

Aspen

(Aspen Technology, Inc., Burlington, MA, www.aspentec.com) A leading provider of smart manufacturing and supply chain management software and services for the process industries, which includes chemicals, metals and minerals, pulp and paper, electric power and consumer packaged goods. Aspen was founded in 1981 to commercialize technology developed by the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) at MIT. From 1976 to 1981, the ASPEN project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and a group of more than 50 industrial participants, after which it went public.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most were simple pictures etched int the aspen tree.
Those were big sheep years in southwest Colorado, when hundreds of shepherds moved their flocks to the thick forage and bedding afforded by the aspen and nearby meadows.
I probably carved my name in the aspen above Spring Creek for all of the same reasons anyone does it.
Locally, aspen are known by a variety of names, most of which refer to the way the leaves flutter in even a whisper of a breeze.
A stand of apparently similar aspen may consist of trees sprung from several different clones.
Southwestern aspen also live longer, up to 150 years, as compared with aspen in the Great Lakes region, which average 60 to 70 years.
Although aspen can regenerate by seed, the seedling's survival is dependent on a number of stringent climactic factors that tend to limit successful sexual reproduction.
It is among stable climax aspen stands growing in deep soils that you realize the unique paradox of the aspen.
Forest Service ecologists Barry Johnston and Leonard Hendzel make the point that in the Rocky Mountain region where they work, aspen may be the longest-lived species, even though the individual stems are among the shortest-lived trees.
Where I live in the Rockies, aspen is the dominant hardwood and in many cases the only hardwood in an ocean of conifers.
A great commerce of life goes on under the canopy of an aspen stand.
Cavity-nesting birds occupy the numerous snags that are characteristic of many aspen stands.