Aspergillus

(redirected from Aspergillus flavus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Aspergillus

[‚as·pər′jil·əs]
(mycology)
A genus of fungi including several species of common molds and some human and plant pathogens.
References in periodicals archive ?
For comparison of result three fungi, Aspergillus paraciticus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus were used as standard.
(2012) observed a high percentage (72) of mycotoxin producing fungi and most of the identified species were Aspergillus flavus. Bugno et al.
Bayman, "An opportunistic human pathogen on the fly: Strains of Aspergillus flavus vary in virulence in Drosophila melanogaster," Medical Mycology, vol.
O extrato de Momordica charantia nas concentracoes de 500 e 1000 ppm foi eficiente na reducao de todos os patogenos e a concentracao de 100 ppm mostrouse eficiente apenas na reducao de Aspergillus flavus, enquanto o extrato de Allamanda blanchetti, reduziu a incidencia apenas de Aspergillus niger na concentracao de 1000 ppm (Tabela 1).
Thus, vitamin A inhibits sclerotial formation in Aspergillus flavus. Thus, vitamin A can effectively control the growth formation of the A.
Biflavonoids inhibit the production of aflatoxin by Aspergillus flavus. Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, v.34, p.1453-1456, 2001.
These include the Aspergillus flavus, which was frequently isolated from maize samples analysed in this study.
Eleven fungal species including Alternaria solani, Aspergillus flavus, A.
Screening of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus strains for extra cellular a-amylase activity.
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 5, 2019-: Global Aflatoxins Market: Worldwide Overview By By Species Type Aspergillus Flavus and Aspergillus Parasiticus), Exposure Method (Plant Product, Animal Product, Air Media)
The anti-fungal activity of these membranes was studied for Aspergillus Flavus, Aspergillus Oryzae and Aspergillus Subolivaeus fungus strains.
(HUANG & HANLIN, 1975; BEUCHAT, 1975), such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, which are important aflatoxinproducing fungi (PITT & HOCKING, 2009).