Assad

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Assad

1. Hafiz al ('hafIz [+ae]l). born 1928, Syrian statesman and general; president of Syria (1971--2000)
2. his son, Bashar al (b[+ae]$&[+ae]l). born 1965, Syrian statesman; president of Syria from 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Eight years after Syrians decided to go to streets and demand their freedom from the Assads who have been ruling the country with an iron fist for more than 40 years now, Hafez Assad's statue returns to the city and remind its residents of the fact that the revolution did not end yet.
The Al Assads created a pervasive apparatus where every ministry could be a ministry of fear, and multiple intelligence and security agencies -- known generically as the mukhabarat -- spied on and intimidated one another as well as the general population: "Assad's Syria was a mukhabarat state whose intelligence agents didn't bother with the pretense of discretion," Abouzeid writes.
As Syrian president Bashar Al Assad prosecutes his 18th year in office, he is presenting himself as a secular leader in a sea of extremism and terror.
It will give a "new perspective on the modern history of Syria" while telling the story of President Bashar Assad and his wife.
*** Top Trump Officials Made Clear The April 14 Attack Against Syria's CW Programme Had This Purpose: To Deter Assad From Using Such Weapons Again As He Had Done Over 200 Times Before
Assad's regime in Syria has a pervasive government apparatus in which every ministry has become a place of fear.
In December 2016, Assads forces captured rebel-held parts of the city of Aleppo, marking the governments biggest victory since the conflict began.
Its also pertinent to mention that an earlier report published in this newspaper informed that thousands of Pakistanis have left for Syria to fight along with Assads forces.
The United States of America should be prepared to use military force, to strike military targets of the Assad regime."
From 1974, the Assads enjoyed Israel's latent protection.
States are fragmenting; a self-proclaimed caliphate has taken deep roots in Syria and Iraq, and now has a presence in many more countries around the world; a rising, still-revolutionary Iran is using proxy forces to destabilize nearly every Arab state; the old order embodied by the secular dynasties of the Mubaraks, Assads and Gadhafis is shattered.
''Turkey, which turned itself into a jihadi freeway in its determination to bring down the Assads,'' reminded David Gardner in the Financial Times, "has in practice boiled down its Syria policy to a single issue: how to stop Syrian Kurds capturing more territory along its southern border.''