forfeiture

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forfeiture

[′fȯr·fə·chər]
(mining engineering)
Loss of a mining claim by operation of the law, without regard to the intention of the locator, whenever he or she fails to preserve his or her right by complying with the conditions imposed by law.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"But with asset forfeiture there is a need to do things in a uniform way.
Advocates argue civil asset forfeiture can cause someone to lose their car or home without even being charged with a crime.
Constitution's protections against excessive fines and fees to state laws and giving plaintiffs like Timbs a new line of attack against asset forfeiture, which has traditionally been fought on due process grounds.
Anti-racketeering revenues were expected to dramatically increase over time after Goddard and Horne prosecuted several large asset forfeiture cases that provided significant amounts of money to the AG's Office, he said.
Kazazi's case has restarted a debate over the asset forfeiture practice, which has many defenders, including the Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
Since its inception in May 2016, OPDAT Guatemala has worked with the host nation on building capacity in extraditions, mutual legal assistance, asset forfeiture, and money laundering matters.
The office's passport and visa fraud unit and human trafficking investigations have led to scores of arrests and prosecutions, and the highest asset forfeitures arising from visa fraud investigations within DS last year.
Having both worked for the Wayne County Prosecutors asset forfeiture department, the brothers also advocate ending all county-run asset forfeiture programs.
With a closely similar focus, Guatemala's Ley de Extincion de Dominio (Asset Forfeiture Law) states that the measure applies to "an asset or assets ...
A case that shows the perverse incentives of civil asset forfeiture is that of Gerald Bryan.
Given the discretion inherent in policing and prosecutorial decisions, this suggests that police arrest patterns may be influenced by the presence of asset forfeiture opportunities: police may choose to focus more on forfeiture-related arrests due to the income that they generate.
This change encourages DOJ to use asset forfeiture as a

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