Assiniboine

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Assiniboine

(əsĭn`əboin), river, 590 mi (950 km) long, rising in S Sask., Canada, and flowing SE into Man. then E to the Red RiverRed River.
1 River, 1,222 mi (1,967 km) long, southernmost of the large tributaries of the Mississippi River. It rises in two branches in the Texas Panhandle and flows SE between Texas and Oklahoma and between Texas and Arkansas to Fulton, Ark.
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 at Winnipeg; named for the local Native Americans, the Assiniboine. The Qu'Appelle and Souris rivers are its chief tributaries. The Assiniboine valley is one of Canada's leading wheat-growing areas. The river was explored by the VérendryeVérendrye, Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de la
, 1685–1749, explorer in W Canada and the United States, b. Trois Rivières (Three Rivers), Que. His father was the sieur de Varennes, for a time governor of Trois Rivières.
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 family in 1736, and forts were built at its mouth and near the site of Portage la Prairie. Settlement spread westward along the river from the Red River valley to the plains. In 1970 the Portage Diversion was built on the river above Portage la Prairie to redirect floodwaters to Lake Manitoba.
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Assiniboine

a river in W Canada, rising in E Saskatchewan and flowing southeast and east to the Red River at Winnipeg. Length: over 860 km (500 miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of the stories deal with the origins of the Assiniboine people, their relationship with other tribes, and their historical placement within the Northern Plains.
When the Assiniboine people agreed to sign the treaty, they were given the chance to select the land on which to reside.
The Assiniboine first appeared in 1930 in the Forty-sixth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology as "Indian Tribes of the Upper Missouri." It is an invaluable work, constituting the point of departure for studies of the Assiniboine people, while also providing important information about the Sioux, Crow, Blackfoot, Plains Cree, Arikara, Hidatsa and Mandan.