Asteria

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Asteria

(ăstēr`ēə), in Greek mythology, daughter of the Titans Coeus and Phoebe, mother of Hecate by Perses. To escape Zeus' amorous advances, she turned into a quail, jumped into the sea, and became the isle of Ortygia (quail island).
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asteria

[ə′stir·ē·ə]
(lapidary)
A gemstone that displays a star or rayed figure when cut in the cabochon style in the proper crystallographic plane.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

asteria

symbol of motherly affection. [Gem. Symbolism: Jobes, 144]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the opening question of Odes 3.7 Asterie, the addressee, is crying for some man (quem, 1).
(17) Furthermore, on first hearing quid fles Asterie? after the focused preoccupation with social and political issues in the Roman Odes, the reader could well imagine Asterie crying 'for Rome' in general.
At the end of the poem the reader has developed some fellow-feeling for Asterie. She is no Penelope to inspire others by a display of her sterling character under difficult circum-stances.
(25) Asterie does not have to be married to Gyges to illustrate the mind-set required to contemplate unfaithfulness or the social pressure experienced by the individual to succumb to temptation.
Furthermore, the direct address in quid fles, Asterie? indicates a dramatic change after the six Roman Odes in which no addressee is mentioned and where 'jegliche personliche Anrede fehlt' (Syndikus 1990:3).
He will return to Asterie at a specific time in the near future--in fact, as soon as possible in spring (primo ...
(15) Davis 1991:47 points out the obvious analogy between the temptations faced by Gyges and those faced by Asterie.
(22) See Cairns's discussion (1995:70) of Asterie as failed elegiac heroine.
(23) Note that no direct answer is given to this question quid fles, Asterie? Asterie is clearly crying because the easy way out--blaming an inconstant beloved--is no longer an option.