Astyages


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Astyages

(ăstī`əjēz), fl. 6th cent. B.C., king of the Medes (584–c.550 B.C.), son and successor of Cyaxares. His rule was harsh, and he was unpopular. His daughter is alleged to have married the elder Cambyses and was said to be the mother of Cyrus the GreatCyrus the Great
, d. 529 B.C., king of Persia, founder of the greatness of the Achaemenids and of the Persian Empire. According to Herodotus, he was the son of an Iranian noble, the elder Cambyses, and a Median princess, daughter of Astyages.
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, who rebelled against Astyages and overthrew him (c.550 B.C.), thus creating the Persian Empire.
References in classic literature ?
Thus a general at the head of his army will endeavour to dethrone the monarch, as Cyrus did Astyages, despising both his manner of life and his forces; his forces for want of action, his life for its effeminacy: thus Suthes, the Thracian, who was general to Amadocus, conspired against him.
Astyages married his daughter to a weak, unthreatening neighbour to the east, the King of Anshan.
183), and Astyages ('naturam traxit eandem, marmoreoque manet vultus mirantis in ore,' 5.
32) For other (Mermnad) examples of politically convenient marriages note Gyges' marriage to Candaules' widow, Toudo (a Mysian princess), and Alyattes offering his daughter to the Median crown prince, Astyages (see Balcer, Sparda by the Bitter Sea, 48-51, where he discusses 'harem factionalism').
His successor Astyages (582-550 BC) did not resist in front of the new opponent: the Persians (1).
For example, the two primary Median rulers, Cyaxares and Astyages, were not emperors in the mold of the Persian Empire but rather authoritative chiefs (see pp.
Cyrus' defeat of the Median king, Astyages, united the Persian peoples into a single kingdom.
At the time when Cyrus induced the Persians to revolt from king Astyages and the Medes he was defeated in battle.
15), and another pair of prophetic dreams, those of Astyages at 1.
In addition, he confiscates the property of his allies, curries popular opinion with methods typical of tyrants, and in the end resembles no one so much as his grandfather Astyages, the lawless, "self-aggrandizing" despot of Media (pp.
A daughter was born to him, whom he called Mandane; and Astyages dreamed that she urinated so much that the urine filled his city, then went on to flood all of Asia.
The stories of Candaules and Astyages indeed have more in common with each other than with the story of Xerxes.