Astyages


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Astyages

(ăstī`əjēz), fl. 6th cent. B.C., king of the Medes (584–c.550 B.C.), son and successor of Cyaxares. His rule was harsh, and he was unpopular. His daughter is alleged to have married the elder Cambyses and was said to be the mother of Cyrus the GreatCyrus the Great
, d. 529 B.C., king of Persia, founder of the greatness of the Achaemenids and of the Persian Empire. According to Herodotus, he was the son of an Iranian noble, the elder Cambyses, and a Median princess, daughter of Astyages.
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, who rebelled against Astyages and overthrew him (c.550 B.C.), thus creating the Persian Empire.
References in classic literature ?
Thus a general at the head of his army will endeavour to dethrone the monarch, as Cyrus did Astyages, despising both his manner of life and his forces; his forces for want of action, his life for its effeminacy: thus Suthes, the Thracian, who was general to Amadocus, conspired against him.
According to tradition, Cyrus the Great chose the site because it lay near the scene of his victory over Astyages the Mede in 550 BCE.
The Median aristocracy was the sole basis of support for the regime other than the various vassal states held in subjection by Cyaxares and his successor Astyages. The reason for the split in the Median aristocratic class is not to clear though Herodotus does tell us the probably fantastic story that Astyages killed the Median noble Harpagus's son and made him eat him at a banquet.
Astyages, King of Media in western Persia, dreamed that his daughter was urinating a golden stream which squirted out of the whole of his kingdom.
(11.) Although in this book Perseus uses Medusa's head to turn other warriors into marble--Thesceleus, ('utque manu iaculum fatale parabat mittere, in hoc haesit signum de mar-more gestu,'5.182-5.183), and Astyages ('naturam traxit eandem, marmoreoque manet vultus mirantis in ore,' 5.205-5.206)--Phineus is the only one set up as an examplum, and a monument.
(32) For other (Mermnad) examples of politically convenient marriages note Gyges' marriage to Candaules' widow, Toudo (a Mysian princess), and Alyattes offering his daughter to the Median crown prince, Astyages (see Balcer, Sparda by the Bitter Sea, 48-51, where he discusses 'harem factionalism').
In Herodotus' s Histories the story of Astiages (or Astyages) contains generic plot devices familiar in commercial drama, including the noble child raised by shepherds, the banquet of human flesh, a series of prophetic dreams, and cases of mistaken identities.
His successor Astyages (582-550 BC) did not resist in front of the new opponent: the Persians (1).
(4) For example, from Liverani's perspective, the desertion of Astyages' army reveals that his authority was loose and dependent upon the will of the troops and their local leaders.
Cyrus' defeat of the Median king, Astyages, united the Persian peoples into a single kingdom.
At the time when Cyrus induced the Persians to revolt from king Astyages and the Medes he was defeated in battle.
15), and another pair of prophetic dreams, those of Astyages at 1.