asylum

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Related to Asylums: Lunatic asylum

asylum

(əsī`ləm), extension of hospitality and protection to a fugitive and the place where such protection is offered. The use of temples and churches for this purpose in ancient and medieval times was known as sanctuarysanctuary,
sacred place, especially the most sacred part of a sacred place. In ancient times and in the Middle Ages, a sanctuary served as asylum, a place of refuge for persons fleeing from violence or from the penalties of the law.
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. In modern international law, the granting of asylum to refugees from other lands is the right of a state by virtue of its territorial sovereignty. A fugitive, however, has no right to demand asylum from the state to which he flees; that state makes its own determination in each case. Between most nations there are treaties of extraditionextradition
, delivery of a person, suspected or convicted of a crime, by the state where he has taken refuge to the state that asserts jurisdiction over him. Its purpose is to prevent criminals who flee a country from escaping punishment.
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 providing for the mutual surrender of fugitives from justice, and there is a tendency to confine the granting of asylum to political refugees and victims of apparent discrimination and intolerance. Asylum has sometimes been granted more broadly; some Third World women have successfully sought asylum for themselves or their daughters in the United States or other Western nations to avoid forced genital mutilation, a traditional practice in a number of societies (see circumcisioncircumcision
, operation to remove the foreskin covering the glans of the penis. It dates back to prehistoric times and was widespread throughout the Middle East as a religious rite before it was introduced among the Hebrews.
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). A situation causing many international disputes is the use of embassies and legations, by virtue of their status of extraterritorialityextraterritoriality
or exterritoriality,
privilege of immunity from local law enforcement enjoyed by certain aliens. Although physically present upon the territory of a foreign nation, those aliens possessing extraterritoriality are considered by customary
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, as places of refuge in times of disorder and conflict. Most countries do not offer this type of asylum except when it seems necessary for the preservation of human life.

asylum

A building or group of buildings that serves as a refuge for the mentally ill.

asylum

1. International law refuge afforded to a person whose extradition is sought by a foreign government
2. Obsolescent an institution for the shelter, treatment, or confinement of individuals, esp a mental hospital (formerly termed lunatic asylum)
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Norwegian newspapers and sites, due to harsh behavior and negligence of concerned authorities more than 150 asylums kids were disappeared just in one refugee camp located near Oslo last year.
Among the relevant issues, the topic of asylum seekers and the validity of Kevin Rudd's Papua New Guinea or 'PNG' solution plays a prominent role in electoral discourse, and was a major source of contention during the most recent televised debate.
Drawing primarily on the records of the Good Shepherd Sisters, who operated four magdalen asylums in Ireland, Finnegan explores the impulses that guided the founding of each of the asylums, the transformation in the function of the asylums from the nineteenth to the twentieth century, and the place of the asylum in Irish society.
detention system for asylum seekers is fundamentally flawed.
The mad hero is quietly but resolutely taken away to his "home" asylum.
In this probing book, Sherrill Cohen shows how many modern custodial institutions had their historical roots in the women's asylums of early modern Europe.
The attractions of asylum nursing, according to Wright, became a means of recruiting women from domestic work, and the skills attained in asylums provided opportunities to move up the occupational scale.
Begun as private businesses for interning the mad, asylums were gradually taken over by the state as the English administrative presence became stronger in the early nineteenth century.
Thus the book begins with a blood-curdling review of the inhumane and authoritarian physical therapies sometimes used in asylums, despite the absence of evidence that any of these were actually employed in Eberbach.
This interesting divergence from the overcrowded conditions of other antebellum asylums could have been explored by examining the factors contributing to the broader acceptance or rejection of the asylum as a new solution to the problem of insanity in South Carolina; instead the author offers financial cost and fear of shame as major reasons for failure to utilize the asylum.
At the same time the mad--precisely because they threatened the regimented order of the workhouse--were separated and placed in segregated and specialized asylums.
Few others are as well-informed or as astute about the operations of American asylums, the thought of professional leaders, or the relationships between the pacesetters and the government.