asynchronous

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asynchronous

[ā′siŋ·krə·nəs]
(computer science)
Operating at a speed determined by the circuit functions rather than by timing signals.
(physics)
Not synchronous.

asynchronous

(architecture)
Not synchronised by a shared signal such as clock or semaphore, proceeding independently.

Opposite: synchronous.

1. <operating system> A process in a multitasking system whose execution can proceed independently, "in the background". Other processes may be started before the asynchronous process has finished.

2. <communications> A communications system in which data transmission may start at any time and is indicated by a start bit, e.g. EIA-232. A data byte (or other element defined by the protocol) ends with a stop bit. A continuous marking condition (identical to stop bits but not quantized in time), is then maintained until data resumes.

asynchronous

Events that are not synchronized or coordinated in time. All the following are asynchronous operations. The interval between transmitting A and B is not the same as between B and C. The ability to initiate a transmission at either end. Storing and forwarding messages. Starting the next operation before the current one is completed. Contrast with synchronous.
References in periodicals archive ?
In large ASYNC broods, the mean mass of chicks that eventually died was significantly less than the mean mass of those that lived for almost every age up to 14 d of age, suggesting death was due to starvation.
Penultimate- and last-hatched chicks in large ASYNC broods required more time to fledge than all other nestlings (all Tukey HSD tests P [is less than] 0.05; Table 4).
Results of RELEASE TEST 2 and 3 suggested that resighting data for young fledged from SYNC and ASYNC broods did not violate assumptions of homogeneity of data (SYNC: [chi square] = 1.24, df = 1, P = 0.27; ASYNC: [chi square] = 2.24, df = 1, P = 0.
Young fledged from SYNC and ASYNC nests differed significantly in their probabilities of being resighted (Table 7).
Model estimates suggested that young from SYNC and ASYNC broods survived at similar rates that varied between years.
A slightly greater proportion of ASYNC young (0.10, n = 166) than SYNC young (0.05, n = 171) later bred within our study site, but the difference was not quite statistically significant ([chi square] = 3.13, df = 1, P = 0.08, power = 0.46).
Male and female parents of large SYNC and ASYNC broods provisioned their young at similar rates at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 23 d after hatching (Fig.
Parental survival.--After raising experimental broods, parents from SYNC and ASYNC nests survived at similar rates that varied between the sexes.
Akaike's Information Criterion confirmed that the most parsimonious model for the data, ([Phi], p), had constant probabilities of resighting and survival that were not significantly different for SYNC and ASYNC females (Table 10).
Male parents of SYNC and ASYNC broods differed in resighting rates but not in survival rates (Table 11).
10, df = 2, P = 0.58; ASYNC: [chi square] = 1.00, df = 2, P = 0.61).
Female parrotlets that raised experimental SYNC first broods were equally likely to lay a second clutch as those that raised experimental ASYNC first broods.