Atacama Large Millimeter Array


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Atacama Large Millimeter Array

(ah-tă-kah -mă) (ALMA) A large international project to construct a millimeter wavelength radio telescope in Llano de Chajnantor, near San Pedro de Atacama in northern Chile. The array comprises 64 separate dishes, each 12 meters in diameter, that can be arranged in a number of configurations with effective sizes of 150 m to 10 km, allowing ALMA to reach angular resolutions of up to 10 milliarcseconds. The altitude of the site (5000 m) ensures good atmospheric transparency at a number of wavebands between 10 mm and 0.350 mm. It will contribute to a number of fields of study including cosmology, extragalactic astronomy, star formation, molecular clouds and planetary science. Following completion of the design and development phase of the project in 2002, construction of the array began in Feb. 2003. Although ALMA is not scheduled to be completed until 2012, initial astronomical observations are planned for 2007.
References in periodicals archive ?
DEBRA SHEPHERD studies protostars at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and is the North American deputy for software for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.
There are another 10 profiles of space observatories, and 11 of future projects such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array and the Gaia Space Observatory.
The leading one in radio astronomy is the construction of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), (1,2) a project for an interferometer aimed at the study of microwave and sub-millimeter signals coming from space.
As far as astronomy is concerned, the next generation of research infrastructures is already being built, with three main projects: the synthesis radio telescope ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) which will bring together Europe, the US and Japan to go back in time to the origins of the universe; the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) with a 30m diameter and a visual acuity a thousand times greater than today's telescopes; the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope which will revolutionise radio astronomy by being able to scan space a million times faster than existing instruments.
The boom is expected to continue for at least the next decade, with plans in the works for the 2011 inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array radio telescope, or ALMA, which will link more than 60 huge antennas in a search for life in space.
Appropriators earmarked $12.5 million for initial construction of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array radio telescope, or ALMA, even though NSF requested only $9 million.
More specifically, I will exploit the James Webb Space Telescope, MOONS (the next generation multi-object spectrograph at the ESO-VLT) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA).Observing programs making use of these unique facilities will provide an unprecedented amount of information, with unprecedented quality, that will enable us to discriminate between various quenching and feedback processes proposed by theories.