Athenaeus


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Athenaeus

(ăth'ənē`əs), fl. c.200, Greek writer, b. Naucratis, Egypt. His anthological work, the Deipnosophistae (Banquet of the Sophists), is a collection of anecdotes and excerpts from ancient writers whose works are otherwise lost.
References in classic literature ?
(also ascribed by Athenaeus to Cercops of Miletus), is thought by Valckenaer to deal with the war of Aegimus against the Lapithae and the aid furnished to him by Heracles, and with the history of Aegimius and his sons.
This charge was still being repeated long after the eruption of Vesuvius: at the turn of the second century, Plutarch accused Epicurus of obsessively recalling his 'sumptuous dinners', while Athenaeus, in his third-century narrative Scholars at the Dinner Table, describes how an Epicurean character wolfs down an eel before anyone else can touch it.
While the work of Asklepiades (fourth-century BCE, that is, the century after Sophocles) has not survived except for fragments, his formula for the riddle is given by Athenaeus, around 190 CE.
(79) At the end of second century CE, Athenaeus wrote, 'it would not be far off the mark to call the city of Rome an epitome of the civilized world, for within it every city may be seen to have planted a colony'.
(106) He had earlier published on Athenaeus and written a work (Eloge d'Helene) inspired by Isocrates.
Closing a road leading to the central market in the Hebron city, in order to allow settlers visiting the so-called "Tomb of Athenaeus Bin-Qenz."
Athenaeus (3.122b, 10.447b) records a few examples from Archilochus; all the fragments are collected in Gerber 1999.
The deserted site was soon reoccupied, and rebuilt by the Milesians or, according to Athenaeus, by the Ephesians.
For example Athenaeus tells us that among the Persians it was the religious duty of the King, once a year, at some stated festival in honour of Mithras, to appear in the temple intoxicated.