Athenaeus

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Athenaeus

(ăth'ənē`əs), fl. c.200, Greek writer, b. Naucratis, Egypt. His anthological work, the Deipnosophistae (Banquet of the Sophists), is a collection of anecdotes and excerpts from ancient writers whose works are otherwise lost.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(114) On the previous day she read a paper at Oberlin College on angel musicians in paintings, and on February 14 she also gave a lecture at the University of Michigan on "How to Organize a Library." She returned to Ann Arbor a year later to address the Honors Assembly at the School of Music on the subject of "Musical Angels and the Dance of Death." (115) The most serious diversion was the preparation of a manuscript titled "Athenaeus, ausgewahlte Kapitel uber Musik aus den Deipnosophisten," about the treatment of music in the Deipnosphistai (Gastronomers), an enormous work (fifteen books survive) by the third-century Greek grammarian Athenaeus of Naucratis, in which learned men hold a conversation at a banquet, and her three-year-long attempt to have Barenreiter publish it.
Pliny the Ancient, in the first century A.D., and Athenaeus of Naucratis (a librarian!), at the end of the second or beginning of the third century, are only two examples of those voracious scholars whose innumerable readings were accompanied by systematic transcription, compilation, selection of excerpts, and reclassification.