Athenaeus

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Athenaeus

(ăth'ənē`əs), fl. c.200, Greek writer, b. Naucratis, Egypt. His anthological work, the Deipnosophistae (Banquet of the Sophists), is a collection of anecdotes and excerpts from ancient writers whose works are otherwise lost.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He begins research on the project, searching for Stelios, a Greek obsessed with Alexander, who believes his tomb is under the Greek cafe Athenaios in Alexandria.
The main data about her historical existence could be gathered from Herodotus, Strabo, Athenaios (the author of Deipnosophistai), Ovid in his Heroides, and the Suidas, the 10th century Greek lexicon.
And Antiochos answered in a letter: We shall send dried figs and sweet wine to you, but it is not lawful among the Greeks to sell a philosopher." This well-known anecdote mirrors the fact that there was some memory among the Greeks of close contacts between the Hellenistic world and India some four hundred years before the time of Athenaios or of the slightly older Hegesander.
We owe the preservation of this fragment to interest in such distinctions, since Athenaios, a third-century scholar, cited Sappho's line to illustrate it.
The Athenaios family let out the villa and various apartments nearby.
(76) The medical properties of wine are also suggested by the comic poet Euboulos, who has the god of wine himself explain the etiquette for the host of a symposium: "For sensible men I prepare only three kraters: one for Health (which they drink first), the second for love and pleasure, and the third for sleep." (77) Athenaios, quoting the 4th-century B.C.
Consider the following example from Thucydides (5.26.1): (17) gegraphe de kai tauta [write.sub.PFCT.3.SG.] and [this.sub.ACC.PL.N.] ho autos Thoukudides Athenaios the-same-Thucydides-[Athenian.sub.NOM.SG.]
Socrates did not just appear from nowhere--he was Athenaios after all--and his statement [at Plato, Apology 38a5-6] may be taken as indicative of at least the possibility that his expressed value was shared by other Athenian citizens.
Athenaios (594 cd) identifies the name as a courtesan name.
The "Cookbooks" section tells us that four cake recipe cookbooks "are specifically mentioned by the Greek chronicler Athenaios as having been cataloged in the Alexandrian library in the 3rd century B.C." And the "Mac" item describes the frustrations and battles centered on how to list "Mac" as opposed to "Mc."