atheroma

(redirected from Atheromatous plaque)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Atheromatous plaque: atherosclerosis, aneurysm

atheroma

[‚ath·ə′rōm·ə]
(medicine)
A lipid deposit in the inner wall of an artery; characteristic of atherosclerosis.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, mCRP appears to play a more direct or "effector" role in atherosclerosis, in contrast to pCRP, which may be described as a "facilitator" in circulation, awaiting dissociation for focalization of proinflammatory effects to injured sites, such as atheromatous plaques [88, 93].
However, due to the additional beneficial effects observed in lead poisoning victims, the ability of EDTA to be used as calcium chelators for the elimination of atheromatous plaques was proposed.
Strokes can be either haemorrhagic, caused for instance by a bursting aneurysm (accounting for 20% of all strokes) or they can be occlusive, possibly resulting from a thrombosis on an atheromatous plaque.
This atheromatous plaque is prone to rupture by proinflammatory cytokines due to activation of monocytes and macrophages and is reflected by the high levels of biomarkers.
Unlike that which is seen in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, there is no atheromatous plaque, typically no significant calcification and no surface ulceration with overlying thrombotic material.
A low ABI indicates peripheral artery disease (PAD), a marker of atheromatous plaque lesions in the coronary and intracranial arteries.
Although an underlying atheromatous plaque has not been excluded with absolute certainty in our patient, it seems very likely that use of a nutritional supplement containing synephrine, octopamine, tyramine and caffeine, combined with intravascular dehydration and impaired renal function, triggered coronary spasm and thrombosis of a major proximal coronary artery.
Most TIAs, however, are due to cardiogenic embolism, cerebral microvascular disease (with threatened lacunar infarction), or large-vessel artery-to-artery thromboembolism, usually from atheromatous plaque at the carotid bifurcation or in the distal portions of the vertebral arteries.
During BAV procedures there is a risk that atheromatous plaque may be dislodged and travel to the brain during the passage of catheters around the aortic arch or during the subsequent balloon dilation of the stenotic and calcified aortic valve.
Studies suggest that high levels of Serum Neopterin may be a marker of atheromatous plaque vulnerability and identify patients at increased risk of serious coronary events (9).
This kind of management would go a long way toward reducing the risk of PAD progression and may even help to induce atheromatous plaque regression.