Asherah

(redirected from Athirat)

Asherah

(ăsh`ərə) or

Asheroth

(-rŏth), Canaanite fertility goddess and the wooden cult symbol that represented her. She is the consort of El in the Ugaritic texts. Several passages in the Bible may refer to the planting of a tree as a symbol of Asherah, or the setting up of a wooden object as an asherah—the Hebrew words for "tree" and "wood" are the same.
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Asherah

mother of the gods; counterpart of Gaea. [Canaanite Myth.: Benét, 57]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, in a 1913 report on the alcohol administration, the director-general of the customs department, Prince Phromphong Athirat, lamented that his officials had been occupied solely with trying to resolve this situation, to the detriment of all other issues (NA R6 Kh 7/12 Phromphong to Chanthaburi, 7 November 1913).
They consider where Jacob dreamed his dream; the story of Dinah and Shechem; the elusive Rephaim; the 70 songs of Athirat, the nations of the world, Deuteronomy 32:8B, 8-9, and the myth of divine election; a proposal to emend the text of Deuteronomy 32:7 and Proverbs 23:22; and the continuing problems of myth versus history in biblical studies.
The Greek translators knew not the goddesses Ashera or Athirat, so 'aserah becomes [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], "grove," reflecting on the one hand Hellenistic religious practices of groves dedicated to various deities and on the other ignorance of the true nature of the biblical object.
Thus, Athirat (Ashera), El's consort, is really his female side: she is also called Elat ('ilt).
Hadley follows the view that Hebrew Asherah can be identified with Ugaritic Athirat (and that both relate to Amorite Ashratum) and that asherah in the Hebrew Bible usually refers to the wooden symbol of the goddess, but also in a handful of cases to the goddess herself.
Chapter two addresses Athirat in the Ugaritic texts.
While most of the discussion in this essay is sensible, some idiosyncratic views intrude (e.g., El's androgynous nature; Shapshu "geminated" into the goddesses Athirat and Rahmay in KTU 1,23; and deities active in a narrative as ciphers for "the tensions inherent in El").
Certainly El's question as to whether he is a "servant" (bd) or Athirat a brick-maker in KTU 1.4 IV 59-61 is germane to a study of divine status.
Yet if the Kirta legend amounts to a complete loss of faith in kingship, as De Moor suggests, why does the author depict deities, such as B[a.sup.[subset]]l, Athirat, and especially El, devoting individual attention to King Kirta?
Kirta also vows a huge sum of silver and gold to the goddess Athirat, should he succeed in taking Hurriya home (KTU 14.I.IV.35-43).
gods and would-be kings.(34) So also, Yassub will be suckled by Athirat and Anat.
Athirat. Hence, even though "the Noble One" enjoys a personal relationship to El, this does not protect him from the designs of El's consort.