Atlanticism


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Atlanticism

advocacy of close cooperation in military, political, and economic matters between Western Europe, esp the UK and the US
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31) David Ellwood, "What Winning Stories Teach: The Marshall Plan and Atlanticism as Enduring Narratives", in Mariano, op.
14) Adeleke Adeeko, "Negritude, Afrocentricism, and Black Atlanticism," in Marvels of the African World: African Cultural Patrimony, New World Connections, and Identities.
The aim of the event was to promote Atlanticism - a greater understanding and improved working relationship between the USA and Europe, which at that time was riven by the USSR's Iron Curtain.
Kupiecki, Atlanticism in Post-1989 Polish Foreign Policy, in R.
A case can be made that British individualism was a combination of mainstream European ideas with this emerging atlanticism, especially as British individualists were regular contributors to Tucker's journal.
campaign, Castillo observes, hinged on the idea of cultivating "a transnational middle class" as well as on the promotion of Atlanticism, the "economic and military alignment that required West German rearmament" (69-70).
Lithuania's interest in having Turkey in the EU stems from the country's commitment to Atlanticism, as well as from the perceived potential benefits in terms of reducing Russia's influence in the EU.
In moments when ardent Atlanticism is out of fashion, Mr Fox might feel he is swimming against the tide when discussing Britain's future role as a military power with his Liberal Democrat cabinet colleagues.
20) This mistrust is constantly being stoked as a consequence of EU expansion eastward since--aside from a traditionally ESDP-skeptical Britain--the pronounced Atlanticism of the new members in Eastern Europe leads them to accuse France of seeking to weaken the alliance.
Maxwell characterizes McKay's travels after his 1922 trip to Russia for the Congress of the Third Communist International as "something of a forced black Atlanticism, required if not defined by bureau stop orders at US ports of entry" (45).
Here, Doyle contends that the political violence of Atlanticism appears in traces in the "Anglo-Atlantic gothic" fiction by Horace Walpole and Matthew Lewis but implodes in the Anglo-Saxonist world imagined, on the other side of the Atlantic, in Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland.
The Report also worries about a resurgent Atlanticism of the US and EU, as well as the deepening of regional financial and economic divisions between the US, Europe, Asia and the BRIC countries.