atmospheric chemistry

(redirected from Atmospheric chemist)

atmospheric chemistry

[¦at·mə¦sfir·ik ′kem·ə·strē]
(meteorology)
The study of the production, transport, modification, and removal of atmospheric constituents in the troposphere and stratosphere.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"CFCs are the main culprit in depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, which protects us from the Sun's ultraviolet radiation," said lead author Matt Rigby, an atmospheric chemist at the University of Bristol.
Daniel Jacob, an atmospheric chemist at Harvard who was not involved in Nisbet's study, said that explanation squares with his own research.
| Saturday, May 26, 5.30pm at Starlight Stage | Aardman's Dan Binns and Ally Lewis talk to Andy Fryers Lewis is an atmospheric chemist and works for the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and the University of York.
"It shows that just because you're in a non-smoking environment, it doesn't mean you aren't exposed to tobacco," said Peter DeCarlo, an atmospheric chemist at Drexel University in Philadelphia and lead author of the study.
"In the past, we've always seen ozone at some stratospheric altitudes go to zero by the end of September," said Bryan Johnson, NOAA atmospheric chemist. "This year our balloon measurements showed the ozone loss rate stalled by the middle of September and ozone levels never reached zero." ( ANI )
In the 1970s, he and atmospheric chemist Richard Stolarski showed that chlorine could deplete stratospheric ozone, work that was cited in the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F.
Susan Solomon, lead author of the study, and an atmospheric chemist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, told The New York Times.
"There's an invisible concerto going on," says Jonathan Williams, an atmospheric chemist at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany.
More recently, James Lovelock, a British atmospheric chemist who was employed by NASA to study the atmospheres of Mars and Venus, developed a theory symbolized by Gaia, a goddess who personified earth for the ancient Greeks.
The Anthropocene is a concept/term originally developed by Dutch atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen, who won the Nobel Prize in 1995 for his work on the depletion of the ozone layer.
One kilogram of desflurane, for instance, is equivalent to 2,500 kilograms of carbon dioxide in terms of the amount of greenhouse warming potential, explained Martin Vollmer, an atmospheric chemist at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology in Dubendorf, Switzerland, who led the new study.
Stoermer and has been widely popularized by the Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist, Paul Crutzen, who regards the influence of human behavior on the Earth's atmosphere in recent centuries as so significant as to constitute a new geological epoch for its lithosphere.

Full browser ?