Atomic Icebreaker Lenin

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Atomic Icebreaker Lenin

 

the first civilian vessel in the world with an atomic reactor, built in the USSR. The atomic icebreaker Lenin was launched on Dec. 5, 1957, and was put into operation at the end of 1959. It was designed to accompany transport ships on the North Sea route and for expedition voyages in the Arctic. Its basic characteristics include a displacement (without load) of 16,000 tons; a main turbine power of 32.4 megawatts (44,000 horsepower); a maximum length of 134.0 m and breadth of 27.6 m, a height of 16.1 m of the sides of the vessel; and a speed in unobstructed waters of 18 knots (33.3 km per hr). Its rate of passage through ice is good. The atomic icebreaker Lenin is a smooth-decked vessel with an elongated center superstructure and two masts; it has a take-off and landing platform in its stern for ice-reconnaissance helicopters. The atomic steam-producing power plant of the pressurized-water type, located in the central part of the ship, produces steam for the four main turbogenerators which feed direct current to the three electric propeller motors. The latter power the three propellers (two on the sides and one in the center), which are of especially sturdy construction. The vessel has two separate auxiliary electric power plants. The mechanisms, equipment, and systems are remote-controlled. The crew is provided with good living conditions for long Arctic voyages. There is no radiation danger to the personnel of the icebreaker or to the environment.

A. M. ZAGIU

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.