atomic absorption spectroscopy

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atomic absorption spectroscopy

[ə¦tä·mik əb¦sörp·shən ‚spek′träs·kə·pē]
(spectroscopy)
An instrumental technique for detecting concentrations of atoms to parts per million by measuring the amount of light absorbed by atoms or ions vaporized in a flame or an electrical furnace.
References in periodicals archive ?
3] sulphuric acid and visible spectrophotometry as well as atomic absorption spectrophotometry analyzed the chromium content.
Serum selenium, zinc, and copper concentrations were determined by using the standard atomic absorption spectrophotometry (21).
In this approach superficial minerals are leached from teeth and Pb is determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry.
Atomic absorption spectrophotometry revealed the presence of considerable amounts of magnesium in the extracts (Sun et al.
Determination of iron and magnesium in small glass fragments using flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry, Journal of the Forensic Science Society (1977) 17:153-159.
Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FFIR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) techniques were employed to characterize the chemical composition of fresh, used, and weathered used oil samples.
Material from the beginning, middle, and end of each cane was given to Jun Ito at the University of Chicago, who performed atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AA) in order to characterize the glasses and to evaluate homogeneity along the cane length.
At the end of the growth period, the plants were ashed, the ashes reconstituted in dilute nitric acid, and the copper present determined with atomic absorption spectrophotometry.
Whole blood specimens were analyzed for total Hg and inorganic Hg for children aged 1-5 years and women aged 16-49 years by automated cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry in CDC's trace elements laboratory.
Laboratory analyses to determine Cd concentrations for the 1988 and 1989 samples were done using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (the Cd detection limit for these early samples was undocumented).
Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was then employed to identify the inorganics in the HCI solution.
She was involved in the analyses of geological samples for metals employing classical wet assay techniques and atomic absorption spectrophotometry.