seizure

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seizure

Pathol a sudden manifestation or recurrence of a disease, such as an epileptic convulsion
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Seizure

 

a pathological neuropsychic state that arises in an abrupt fitlike manner. Seizures frequently take the form of convulsions or other involuntary movements accompanied by clouding of consciousness. This stage is later replaced by a deep pathological sleep or stupor. Epilepsy, hysteria, and diseases of the brain can produce seizures. Seizures may occur in the form of a sudden relaxation of muscle tone (cataplectic seizure) or a sudden falling asleep (narcoleptic seizure). The term “seizure” is also used in the broader sense of paroxysm.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

seizure

[′sē·zhər]
(medicine)
The sudden onset or recurrence of a disease or an attack.
Specifically, an epileptic attack, fit, or convulsion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results showed that the patients who were administered rufinamide experienced a significant reduction in tonic and atonic seizure frequency (change in seizure frequency; rufinamide arm: -42.5%; placebo arm: 1.4%; p=<0.0001) and overall seizure frequency (change in seizure frequency; rufinamide arm: -32.7%; placebo arm: -11.7%; p=0.0015).
Atonic seizures consist of a sudden and general loss of muscle tone, particularly in the arms and legs, which often results in a fall.
Studies have demonstrated that NS is a seizure disorder with a sentinel and defining feature of paroxysmal episodes during which the head bobs forward repeatedly because of atonic seizures (1).
Conversely, atonic seizures involve a sudden loss of tone and consciousness (Yamamoto et al., 2004), and although the seizures last only for a few seconds without respiratory compromise, these individuals are at extremely high risk for falls and injury because of the clinical presentation of their seizure (Yamamoto et al., 2004).
Other types of generalized seizures are: tonic seizures which involve muscie rigidity but are not followed by a clonic phase; clonic seizures which involve violent rhythmic contractions but is not preceded by tonic phase; myoclonic seizures in which a person has brief involuntary jerking of the torso or extremities; and atonic seizures in which the skeletal muscles lose all tone causing the person to suddenly drop to the floor.
Atonic seizures involve the loss of muscle tone, causing the person to fall to the ground in what are sometimes called "drop attacks." Status epilepticus refers to continuous seizure activity with no recovery between successive tonic-clonic seizures.
Not to mention, he started to experience, at the time, what are called atonic seizures (drop-attack seizures of paralysis).
It appears to work best for refractory myoclonic and atonic seizures and improves cognitive function, Dr.