Atreus

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Related to Atreidae: Atrides, House of Atreus

Atreus

(ā`trēəs), in Greek mythology, the son of Pelops and the father of Agamemnon and Menelaus. He vied with his brother Thyestes for the throne of Mycenae. When Thyestes seduced Atreus' wife, Aerope, in order to attain the golden ram whose possession signified kingship, Atreus, in retaliation, murdered the sons of Thyestes and served them to him at a feast. Thyestes thereupon laid a curse upon the house of Atreus. Thyestes' son Aegisthus, who was not involved in the mass murder, killed Atreus and restored the kingdom to Thyestes.

Atreus

slew his brother Thyestes’s sons and served them to their father at banquet. [Gk. Myth.: Jobes, 153]

Atreus

cuckolded by brother, serves him his sons for dinner. [Rom. Lit.: Thyestes, Brewer Dictionary, 1081]
References in periodicals archive ?
198.2-8): rather than waste his resources in fruitless competition with the Atreidae, he sends a respectful embassy, but no gift.
Finally, Neoptolemus strikes a note similar to the call for divine vengeance against Odysseus and the Atreidae that closes Philoctetes' speech (315-16) by declaring that "whoever hates the sons of Atreus" is dear both to him and to the gods (389-90).
As far as Aegisthus is concerned, in the previous tragic versions of the Atreidae myth his characterization is not as refined as the one he receives at the hands of Euripides, where his tyrannical character is more fully explored.
(14) Similarly, in both Aeschylus's and Sophocles's Atreidae plays, the Argive people show their hostility against Aegisthus, while they never fail to proclaim their solidarity with their legitimate, if exiled, king.