Atrophic Rhinitis of Swine

Atrophic Rhinitis of Swine

 

(Rhinitis atrophica suum), a disease of swine, predominantly young animals, characterized chiefly by a sharp change in the form of the facial skull bones and particularly the nasal conchae (curved snout). The cause of the disease is not established. Hygienic conditions and feeding are of significance in the occurrence and distribution of the disease. Most susceptible to atrophic rhinitis of swine are sucklings (up to two or three weeks); quite often the carriers are young sows (65–75 percent). The incubation (latent) period of the disease is five to 15 days, the course of the illness is most often chronic. The ailing animals lose their appetite, become emaciated, and their growth is retarded; sneezing causes pyoid hemorrhages from the snout; there is often a disruption of motor coordination and strabismus. The economic damage caused by the disease is significant. Cases of atrophic rhinitis of swine have been recorded in many nations of the world. Treatment consists of antibiotics, sulfanilamides, and vitamins A and D. Prophylaxis includes the observance of hygienic requirements in tending and feeding and providing a diet that is balanced in terms of protein, vitamins, and minerals.