attention deficit disorder

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Related to Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: ADD

attention deficit disorder

[ə′ten·shən ¦def·ə·sət dis‚ȯr·dər]
(psychology)
A psychiatric disorder of childhood characterized by attention span problems and impulsivity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The central nervous system stimulant drugs market analysis considers sales from attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, narcolepsy, and others.
The Wender Utah Rating Scale: An Aid in the Retrospective Diagnosis of Childhood Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Am J Psychiatry 1993; 150:885-890.
Prevalence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in substance use disorder patients: a meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis.
Dopamine-serotonin interactions in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Overall, 88% of the 24 comorbid patients were male, and the average age of onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was slightly higher among patients with comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Stimulants have the best evidence of effectiveness in the treatment of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder now have a treatment specifically indicated for them.
The National Institute of Mental Health says about 3 percent to 5 percent of the population, mostly children, has attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. A recent study by Washington State University showed physician office visits to treat ADHD more than doubled between 1990 and 1995, and prescriptions for treatment, including drugs such as Ritalin, nearly tripled among 5- to 18-year-olds, according to Science Daily magazine.
Combining methylphenidate (Ritalin) with clonidine (Catapres) reduced the severity of tics in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder more effectively in combination than did either drug alone, said Dr.
Silver's Advice to parents on Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, 1993.
Using structured interviews, the research team led by Silvia Martins, MD, PhD, Mailman School associate professor of Epidemiology, evaluated psychiatric disorders including: internalizing disorders (depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder) and externalizing disorders (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder and oppositional-defiant disorder).
Nearly half a million cases of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder among U.S.

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