visual flight

(redirected from Attitude flying)

visual flight

[′vizh·ə·wəl ′flīt]
(aerospace engineering)
An aircraft flight occurring under conditions which allow navigation by visual reference to the earth's surface at a safe altitude and with sufficient horizontal visibility, and operating under visual flight rules. Also known as VFR flight.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If nothing else, if the student later crashes upon entering IMC for the first time, and the instructor is placed on the witness stand, how is he or she going to explain an "above average" grade on attitude flying?
It solidly connects basic attitude flying skills to real-world instrument flight in ways that are often glossed over during initial instrument training, and are almost never practiced with this intensity after a pilot earns an instrument rating.
ILS approach to minimums with primary attention to attitude, airspeed and altitude, using basic attitude flying skills.
Basic attitude flying is primary; the GPS and other needles only tell you which direction to fly the airplane.
Many pilots have a couple moments of sloppy attitude flying just after they enter the clouds and mentally settle down and fly via instruments with precision.
Having the pressure off makes the act of attitude flying easier.
Attitude flying basics say we should spend more effort monitoring instruments that predict what the airplane will do next (control instruments), rather than those that tell us what has already happened (performance instruments).
Thanks largely to the EAA, the average instrument pilot is woefully ignorant of attitude flying, which is what every military and turbine pilot is taught as the most effective, precise method of controlling an airplane.
Attitude flying is a complex subject, but central to it is the fact that the attitude indicator is the only instrument that can tell you what the airplane is going to do before it happens.
This one event encompasses most all IFR knowledge: weather, positional awareness, attitude flying, SA, equipment knowledge, spatial disorientation, the list goes on.
I recommend retaining the ability to use a turn coordinator if you have one--but I also recommend that you base all your day-to-day crosscheck on attitude flying. This just improves efficiency.

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